Date: 2/01/2018 18:09:37
From: Tau.Neutrino
ID: 1168402
Subject: Art Exhibitions

Art Exhibitions

I went and saw the Hyperreal art exhibition at the National Art Gallery Of Australia

https://nga.gov.au/hyperreal/

Hyperreal Overview
Hyperreal Works

Well worth the ticket cost

Haven’t been to this one yet.

Giant skulls and 3D-printed death masks: Art meets technology in the NGV Triennial

Giant skulls and 3D-printed death masks: Art meets technology in the NGV Triennial

Melbourne’s inaugural Triennial exhibition at the National Gallery of Victoria (NGV) is an exuberant and exhilarating display of contemporary art featuring pieces from over 100 artists and designers from 32 countries. One of the prevailing features of this extraordinarily immersive spectacle is how deeply technology is infiltrating the world of art, from gorgeous 3D-printed death masks to an overwhelming room-scale installation that incorporates projections with movement sensors.

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Date: 2/01/2018 19:07:14
From: mollwollfumble
ID: 1168442
Subject: re: Art Exhibitions

Tau.Neutrino said:


Art Exhibitions

I went and saw the Hyperreal art exhibition at the National Art Gallery Of Australia

https://nga.gov.au/hyperreal/

Hyperreal Overview
Hyperreal Works

Well worth the ticket cost

Haven’t been to this one yet.

Giant skulls and 3D-printed death masks: Art meets technology in the NGV Triennial

Giant skulls and 3D-printed death masks: Art meets technology in the NGV Triennial

Melbourne’s inaugural Triennial exhibition at the National Gallery of Victoria (NGV) is an exuberant and exhilarating display of contemporary art featuring pieces from over 100 artists and designers from 32 countries. One of the prevailing features of this extraordinarily immersive spectacle is how deeply technology is infiltrating the world of art, from gorgeous 3D-printed death masks to an overwhelming room-scale installation that incorporates projections with movement sensors.

“Hyperrealism, paralleling photorealism in painting, began in the 1960s and 70s when a number of sculptors became interested in a form of sculptural realism based on a vivid and lifelike representation of the human figure. From kinetic sculpture to bio art, this exhibition extends our perception of what constitutes the hyperreal.”

Photorealism in paintings I understand – it relies on the difference between the perception of colours by the eye and of the camera lens. For starters, the camera lens tends to be less soft because it enhances contrast differences beyond what is normally seen by the human eye. The eye automatically reduces contrast whereas the camera lens doesn’t.

But that doesn’t explain hyperrealism in sculpture. What is it?

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Date: 2/01/2018 19:22:41
From: Tau.Neutrino
ID: 1168453
Subject: re: Art Exhibitions

mollwollfumble said:


Tau.Neutrino said:

Art Exhibitions

I went and saw the Hyperreal art exhibition at the National Art Gallery Of Australia

https://nga.gov.au/hyperreal/

Hyperreal Overview
Hyperreal Works

Well worth the ticket cost

Haven’t been to this one yet.

Giant skulls and 3D-printed death masks: Art meets technology in the NGV Triennial

Giant skulls and 3D-printed death masks: Art meets technology in the NGV Triennial

Melbourne’s inaugural Triennial exhibition at the National Gallery of Victoria (NGV) is an exuberant and exhilarating display of contemporary art featuring pieces from over 100 artists and designers from 32 countries. One of the prevailing features of this extraordinarily immersive spectacle is how deeply technology is infiltrating the world of art, from gorgeous 3D-printed death masks to an overwhelming room-scale installation that incorporates projections with movement sensors.

“Hyperrealism, paralleling photorealism in painting, began in the 1960s and 70s when a number of sculptors became interested in a form of sculptural realism based on a vivid and lifelike representation of the human figure. From kinetic sculpture to bio art, this exhibition extends our perception of what constitutes the hyperreal.”

Photorealism in paintings I understand – it relies on the difference between the perception of colours by the eye and of the camera lens. For starters, the camera lens tends to be less soft because it enhances contrast differences beyond what is normally seen by the human eye. The eye automatically reduces contrast whereas the camera lens doesn’t.

But that doesn’t explain hyperrealism in sculpture. What is it?

Maybe this will help?

Hyperrealistic Sculptures Blur the Line Between Clay and Flesh

Hyperrealistic sculpture is the meticulous art form which captures the complex human aesthetic so perfectly that the figures could almost be alive and breathing. Using mostly clay, resin and silicone, hyperrealist sculptors make 3-dimensional models and paint every feature, from the sags and curves of the skin to each dandruff-laden follicle. No detail is neglected. These sculptures can take months to finish and it’s not hard to see why. They are impossibly realistic and have tapped into our natural curiosity about our own shells, our fascination with wrinkles, folds, greasy pores and the different shapes and sizes of the human body.

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Date: 2/01/2018 19:24:30
From: Tau.Neutrino
ID: 1168454
Subject: re: Art Exhibitions

Tau.Neutrino said:


mollwollfumble said:

Tau.Neutrino said:

Art Exhibitions

I went and saw the Hyperreal art exhibition at the National Art Gallery Of Australia

https://nga.gov.au/hyperreal/

Hyperreal Overview
Hyperreal Works

Well worth the ticket cost

Haven’t been to this one yet.

Giant skulls and 3D-printed death masks: Art meets technology in the NGV Triennial

Giant skulls and 3D-printed death masks: Art meets technology in the NGV Triennial

Melbourne’s inaugural Triennial exhibition at the National Gallery of Victoria (NGV) is an exuberant and exhilarating display of contemporary art featuring pieces from over 100 artists and designers from 32 countries. One of the prevailing features of this extraordinarily immersive spectacle is how deeply technology is infiltrating the world of art, from gorgeous 3D-printed death masks to an overwhelming room-scale installation that incorporates projections with movement sensors.

“Hyperrealism, paralleling photorealism in painting, began in the 1960s and 70s when a number of sculptors became interested in a form of sculptural realism based on a vivid and lifelike representation of the human figure. From kinetic sculpture to bio art, this exhibition extends our perception of what constitutes the hyperreal.”

Photorealism in paintings I understand – it relies on the difference between the perception of colours by the eye and of the camera lens. For starters, the camera lens tends to be less soft because it enhances contrast differences beyond what is normally seen by the human eye. The eye automatically reduces contrast whereas the camera lens doesn’t.

But that doesn’t explain hyperrealism in sculpture. What is it?

Maybe this will help?

Hyperrealistic Sculptures Blur the Line Between Clay and Flesh

Hyperrealistic sculpture is the meticulous art form which captures the complex human aesthetic so perfectly that the figures could almost be alive and breathing. Using mostly clay, resin and silicone, hyperrealist sculptors make 3-dimensional models and paint every feature, from the sags and curves of the skin to each dandruff-laden follicle. No detail is neglected. These sculptures can take months to finish and it’s not hard to see why. They are impossibly realistic and have tapped into our natural curiosity about our own shells, our fascination with wrinkles, folds, greasy pores and the different shapes and sizes of the human body.

And this kind of art form could lead to life like looking robots.

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Date: 3/01/2018 20:09:55
From: mollwollfumble
ID: 1169126
Subject: re: Art Exhibitions

Tau.Neutrino said:

Maybe this will help?

Hyperrealistic Sculptures Blur the Line Between Clay and Flesh

Hyperrealistic sculpture is the meticulous art form which captures the complex human aesthetic so perfectly that the figures could almost be alive and breathing. Using mostly clay, resin and silicone, hyperrealist sculptors make 3-dimensional models and paint every feature, from the sags and curves of the skin to each dandruff-laden follicle. No detail is neglected. These sculptures can take months to finish and it’s not hard to see why. They are impossibly realistic and have tapped into our natural curiosity about our own shells, our fascination with wrinkles, folds, greasy pores and the different shapes and sizes of the human body.

That helps enormously – if it’s true.

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