Date: 2/01/2018 19:05:43
From: Tau.Neutrino
ID: 1168438
Subject: Top 2018 Astronomy Events

Top 2018 Astronomy Events

Happy New Year 2018.

One of the toughest choices we made last year was to not write a full astronomy guide for 2018. We’ve done this in one iteration or another now for about a decade, but an ongoing project (also astronomical in nature) has consumed most of our writing hours… but we recently realized that we can still take stock in what’s in the sky for the year ahead, and give you a sneak peek at part of our project for the end of 2018.

more…

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Date: 2/01/2018 19:13:23
From: mollwollfumble
ID: 1168445
Subject: re: Top 2018 Astronomy Events

Tau.Neutrino said:


Top 2018 Astronomy Events

Happy New Year 2018.

One of the toughest choices we made last year was to not write a full astronomy guide for 2018. We’ve done this in one iteration or another now for about a decade, but an ongoing project (also astronomical in nature) has consumed most of our writing hours… but we recently realized that we can still take stock in what’s in the sky for the year ahead, and give you a sneak peek at part of our project for the end of 2018.

more…

The two astronomy events for 2018 that matter to me are:

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Date: 2/01/2018 19:19:56
From: Cymek
ID: 1168449
Subject: re: Top 2018 Astronomy Events

mollwollfumble said:


Tau.Neutrino said:

Top 2018 Astronomy Events

Happy New Year 2018.

One of the toughest choices we made last year was to not write a full astronomy guide for 2018. We’ve done this in one iteration or another now for about a decade, but an ongoing project (also astronomical in nature) has consumed most of our writing hours… but we recently realized that we can still take stock in what’s in the sky for the year ahead, and give you a sneak peek at part of our project for the end of 2018.

more…

The two astronomy events for 2018 that matter to me are:

  • Launch of ICESat-2. (Because current satellite imaging of Earth fails miserably when it tries to observe ice and snow).
  • Launch of James Webb Space Telescope. (Oh darn it, recently postponed from Oct 2018 to mid-2019).

The documentary on the making of the JWST was interesting, impressive technology

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Date: 3/01/2018 18:38:47
From: mollwollfumble
ID: 1169050
Subject: re: Top 2018 Astronomy Events

TV sbs after news.

“Space volcanos”

Will include the volcanos on Io and on Mars. Haven’t decided whether to watch it yet.

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Date: 3/01/2018 18:55:56
From: AwesomeO
ID: 1169052
Subject: re: Top 2018 Astronomy Events

mollwollfumble said:


TV sbs after news.

“Space volcanos”

Will include the volcanos on Io and on Mars. Haven’t decided whether to watch it yet.

Not much else of interest (to me) on at that time, followed by Strange Signals from Outer Space. After that is … SHIELDWALL, but that’s a different genre.

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Date: 3/01/2018 20:12:15
From: mollwollfumble
ID: 1169130
Subject: re: Top 2018 Astronomy Events

AwesomeO said:


mollwollfumble said:

TV sbs after news.

“Space volcanos”

Will include the volcanos on Io and on Mars. Haven’t decided whether to watch it yet.

Not much else of interest (to me) on at that time, followed by Strange Signals from Outer Space. After that is … SHIELDWALL, but that’s a different genre.

I’m enjoying the volcanic eruptions on Venus.

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Date: 3/01/2018 20:14:38
From: AwesomeO
ID: 1169132
Subject: re: Top 2018 Astronomy Events

mollwollfumble said:


AwesomeO said:

mollwollfumble said:

TV sbs after news.

“Space volcanos”

Will include the volcanos on Io and on Mars. Haven’t decided whether to watch it yet.

Not much else of interest (to me) on at that time, followed by Strange Signals from Outer Space. After that is … SHIELDWALL, but that’s a different genre.

I’m enjoying the volcanic eruptions on Venus.

When I was young I thought that planets were inert and water in the universe was scarce. Seems now that planets are dynamic, more so than Earth and water is everywhere.

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Date: 3/01/2018 20:16:13
From: party_pants
ID: 1169133
Subject: re: Top 2018 Astronomy Events

AwesomeO said:


mollwollfumble said:

AwesomeO said:

Not much else of interest (to me) on at that time, followed by Strange Signals from Outer Space. After that is … SHIELDWALL, but that’s a different genre.

I’m enjoying the volcanic eruptions on Venus.

When I was young I thought that planets were inert and water in the universe was scarce. Seems now that planets are dynamic, more so than Earth and water is everywhere.

Water, water everywhere, nor any drop to drink.

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Date: 4/01/2018 19:01:38
From: mollwollfumble
ID: 1169533
Subject: re: Top 2018 Astronomy Events

I’ve been wanting someone to do this. Track the expansion of recent debris from recent astronomical explosions as a function of time. It’s been done before – badly – with the supernova 1987a in the Magellanic Cloud, with the light echo from Monoceros, and with a planetary nebula. But not as well as this.

This is the Crab nebula – filmed with the same telescope over 10 years. The shed ellipses in the middle come from the crab pulsar.

Fit to window:
https://www.astrobin.com/full/327338/0/

Slightly higher resolution in https://www.astrobin.com/full/327338/0/?real=&mod=

Every supernova remnant and planetary nebula should have a movie like this.

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