Date: 13/01/2018 10:13:50
From: Tau.Neutrino
ID: 1173485
Subject: Electrification of older cars

Is the electrification of older cars viable on a large scale?

Or will it stay a custom niche industry?

Take out engine, drive lines, diff, fuel tank etc.

Replace with battery, electric drive hub wheels, new reverse cycle heating and cooling system etc.

Reply Quote

Date: 13/01/2018 10:17:35
From: roughbarked
ID: 1173489
Subject: re: Electrification of older cars

Tau.Neutrino said:

Is the electrification of older cars viable on a large scale?

Or will it stay a custom niche industry?

Take out engine, drive lines, diff, fuel tank etc.

Replace with battery, electric drive hub wheels, new reverse cycle heating and cooling system etc.

too heavy.

Reply Quote

Date: 13/01/2018 10:37:33
From: Tau.Neutrino
ID: 1173495
Subject: re: Electrification of older cars

roughbarked said:


Tau.Neutrino said:

Is the electrification of older cars viable on a large scale?

Or will it stay a custom niche industry?

Take out engine, drive lines, diff, fuel tank etc.

Replace with battery, electric drive hub wheels, new reverse cycle heating and cooling system etc.

too heavy.

Ok, I wonder then how much the new electric cars bodies weigh? Then look at how much more recent car bodies weigh say from 2000 onwards etc or even earlier?

I know really early cars had some sort of chassis and frame which is heavy.

Or are the more recent cars still too heavy?

Which car body weight is more suitable?

Reply Quote

Date: 13/01/2018 10:39:26
From: party_pants
ID: 1173496
Subject: re: Electrification of older cars

I would say at the moment not. It would need to be some kind of cheep and quick and mass-produced conversion kit, but at the same time bespoke for each make and model. If it became possible to do a conversion for say the cost of 3 or 4 regular services then maybe people will opt for conversion in a big way over just buying a new car. Have to bear in mind that if the technology improves so much to make conversion cheap that technology will also make new electric cars more desirable too.

Can only see it happening if there was some hard deadline to allow only electric cars on nominated date.

Reply Quote

Date: 13/01/2018 10:53:19
From: captain_spalding
ID: 1173498
Subject: re: Electrification of older cars

‘Electrification of older cars’

When i saw that, it made me think of what my dad told me about how he and his mates would ‘thief-proof’ their cars in their younger days.

One of cars had a trembler coil fitted, and they’d park the cars nose-to-tail so that the metal bumper bars just touched.

Then, they’d go away, secure in the knowledge that if anyone tried to get into any of their cars, they’d get a jolt that would knock them flat on their arse.

They did things differently, in the ast.

Reply Quote

Date: 13/01/2018 10:53:57
From: captain_spalding
ID: 1173499
Subject: re: Electrification of older cars

captain_spalding said:

They did things differently, in the ast.

They did things differently, in the past,/i>.

Reply Quote

Date: 13/01/2018 10:54:32
From: Michael V
ID: 1173500
Subject: re: Electrification of older cars

What about the pollution all these electric vehicles will make?

Reply Quote

Date: 13/01/2018 10:54:48
From: captain_spalding
ID: 1173501
Subject: re: Electrification of older cars

My typing isn’t good today.

It’s already very hot here, and dry as dust.

Reply Quote

Date: 13/01/2018 10:56:09
From: captain_spalding
ID: 1173502
Subject: re: Electrification of older cars

Michael V said:


What about the pollution all these electric vehicles will make?

Solved:

Reply Quote

Date: 13/01/2018 11:08:15
From: mollwollfumble
ID: 1173504
Subject: re: Electrification of older cars

roughbarked said:


Tau.Neutrino said:

Is the electrification of older cars viable on a large scale?

Or will it stay a custom niche industry?

Take out engine, drive lines, diff, fuel tank etc.

Replace with battery, electric drive hub wheels, new reverse cycle heating and cooling system etc.

too heavy.

Perhaps so, perhaps not. How much of a reduced range would you be prepared to put up with? 50 km?

I did a bit of work for csiro on retrofitting a Holden Commodore with batteries and an electric motor in place of a petrol engine. It can be done, but you have to fill every spare nook and cranny with batteries.

Reply Quote

Date: 13/01/2018 11:11:19
From: roughbarked
ID: 1173505
Subject: re: Electrification of older cars

captain_spalding said:


My typing isn’t good today.

It’s already very hot here, and dry as dust.

Yesterday was ‘orrible. Today is a balmy day that won’t get above 28

Reply Quote

Date: 13/01/2018 11:12:03
From: captain_spalding
ID: 1173508
Subject: re: Electrification of older cars

mollwollfumble said:


It can be done, but you have to fill every spare nook and cranny with batteries.

So, no luggage that you aren’t willing to hold on your lap for the whole of the trip?

Reply Quote

Date: 13/01/2018 11:16:22
From: party_pants
ID: 1173509
Subject: re: Electrification of older cars

mollwollfumble said:


roughbarked said:

Tau.Neutrino said:

Is the electrification of older cars viable on a large scale?

Or will it stay a custom niche industry?

Take out engine, drive lines, diff, fuel tank etc.

Replace with battery, electric drive hub wheels, new reverse cycle heating and cooling system etc.

too heavy.

Perhaps so, perhaps not. How much of a reduced range would you be prepared to put up with? 50 km?

I did a bit of work for csiro on retrofitting a Holden Commodore with batteries and an electric motor in place of a petrol engine. It can be done, but you have to fill every spare nook and cranny with batteries.

What sort of batteries?

Reply Quote

Date: 13/01/2018 11:17:02
From: roughbarked
ID: 1173510
Subject: re: Electrification of older cars

mollwollfumble said:


roughbarked said:

Tau.Neutrino said:

Is the electrification of older cars viable on a large scale?

Or will it stay a custom niche industry?

Take out engine, drive lines, diff, fuel tank etc.

Replace with battery, electric drive hub wheels, new reverse cycle heating and cooling system etc.

too heavy.

Perhaps so, perhaps not. How much of a reduced range would you be prepared to put up with? 50 km?

I did a bit of work for csiro on retrofitting a Holden Commodore with batteries and an electric motor in place of a petrol engine. It can be done, but you have to fill every spare nook and cranny with batteries.

Smarter to design a lighter car to fit the purpose.

Reply Quote

Date: 13/01/2018 11:23:22
From: Michael V
ID: 1173511
Subject: re: Electrification of older cars

The pollution caused by all these proposed extra electric motors concerns me.

Reply Quote

Date: 13/01/2018 11:28:06
From: roughbarked
ID: 1173513
Subject: re: Electrification of older cars

Michael V said:


The pollution caused by all these proposed extra electric motors concerns me.

We could always develop the opposite of gravity, which happens to be comedy.

Reply Quote

Date: 13/01/2018 11:29:45
From: captain_spalding
ID: 1173514
Subject: re: Electrification of older cars

roughbarked said:


Michael V said:

The pollution caused by all these proposed extra electric motors concerns me.

We could always develop the opposite of gravity, which happens to be comedy.

There’s a large team in Canberra working right now on running the country on the basis of farce.

Reply Quote

Date: 13/01/2018 11:30:39
From: Tau.Neutrino
ID: 1173515
Subject: re: Electrification of older cars

roughbarked said:


mollwollfumble said:

roughbarked said:

too heavy.

Perhaps so, perhaps not. How much of a reduced range would you be prepared to put up with? 50 km?

I did a bit of work for csiro on retrofitting a Holden Commodore with batteries and an electric motor in place of a petrol engine. It can be done, but you have to fill every spare nook and cranny with batteries.

Smarter to design a lighter car to fit the purpose.

Yes, power to weight ratio and stuff like that, electric motors would last longer on lighter cars I would imagine.

Reply Quote

Date: 13/01/2018 11:33:38
From: Tau.Neutrino
ID: 1173516
Subject: re: Electrification of older cars

List of countries banning fossil fuel vehicles

From 2005 an expanding list of countries have proposed and later decided to ban the future sale of passenger vehicles powered by so-called fossil fuels such as gasoline (“gas” or “petrol”), LPG and diesel. The intent to ban vehicles powered by fossil fuels is attractive to government as its offers simpler target compliance compared with more encompassing phase-out of fossil fuels.

more…

Reply Quote

Date: 13/01/2018 11:38:44
From: captain_spalding
ID: 1173517
Subject: re: Electrification of older cars

Tau.Neutrino said:


…to ban the future sale of passenger vehicles powered by so-called fossil fuels such as gasoline (“gas” or “petrol”), LPG and diesel.

How they all laughed when i bought the manufacturing rights to Foden Steam Tractors!

Who’s laughing now? Huh? Huh?

Reply Quote

Date: 13/01/2018 11:53:53
From: Michael V
ID: 1173519
Subject: re: Electrification of older cars

roughbarked said:


Michael V said:

The pollution caused by all these proposed extra electric motors concerns me.

We could always develop the opposite of gravity, which happens to be comedy.

No joke. I’m serious.

Reply Quote

Date: 13/01/2018 11:55:52
From: ChrispenEvan
ID: 1173520
Subject: re: Electrification of older cars

Michael V said:


roughbarked said:

Michael V said:

The pollution caused by all these proposed extra electric motors concerns me.

We could always develop the opposite of gravity, which happens to be comedy.

No joke. I’m serious.

what pollution are you concerned about?

Reply Quote

Date: 13/01/2018 11:58:46
From: captain_spalding
ID: 1173521
Subject: re: Electrification of older cars

Michael V said:


roughbarked said:

Michael V said:

The pollution caused by all these proposed extra electric motors concerns me.

We could always develop the opposite of gravity, which happens to be comedy.

No joke. I’m serious.

Yeah, i think we know what you mean. Making heavy electrical equipment is definitely not the most eco-friendly of industries.

But, what can be done? Unless we do revert to using the power of sails made from organically-grown hemp (no, no wacky weed in this crop. No, none. No, that’s right out. Really.) then there’s always going to be some impact from manufacturing transport.

Reply Quote

Date: 13/01/2018 12:05:01
From: Michael V
ID: 1173522
Subject: re: Electrification of older cars

ChrispenEvan said:


Michael V said:

roughbarked said:

We could always develop the opposite of gravity, which happens to be comedy.

No joke. I’m serious.

what pollution are you concerned about?

The generation of electricity to run them.

Reply Quote

Date: 13/01/2018 12:11:21
From: ChrispenEvan
ID: 1173523
Subject: re: Electrification of older cars

Michael V said:


ChrispenEvan said:

Michael V said:

No joke. I’m serious.

what pollution are you concerned about?

The generation of electricity to run them.

if fossil fuel is used then there will be that pollution. thing is they are being charged by a central power source as opposed to ICE which are all run individually and therefore less efficient.

Reply Quote

Date: 13/01/2018 12:13:42
From: roughbarked
ID: 1173524
Subject: re: Electrification of older cars

captain_spalding said:


roughbarked said:

Michael V said:

The pollution caused by all these proposed extra electric motors concerns me.

We could always develop the opposite of gravity, which happens to be comedy.

There’s a large team in Canberra working right now on running the country on the basis of farce.

There is that.

Reply Quote

Date: 13/01/2018 12:15:17
From: roughbarked
ID: 1173525
Subject: re: Electrification of older cars

Michael V said:


roughbarked said:

Michael V said:

The pollution caused by all these proposed extra electric motors concerns me.

We could always develop the opposite of gravity, which happens to be comedy.

No joke. I’m serious.

But but I was always about making light of the issue. ;)

Reply Quote

Date: 13/01/2018 12:22:46
From: Tau.Neutrino
ID: 1173527
Subject: re: Electrification of older cars

When is Australia going to ban fossil fuel cars and vehicles?

Will they be phased out slowly?

Will electric conversion be available for certain lighter cars that meet weight requirements?

Reply Quote

Date: 13/01/2018 12:23:38
From: roughbarked
ID: 1173528
Subject: re: Electrification of older cars

Tau.Neutrino said:


When is Australia going to ban fossil fuel cars and vehicles?

Will they be phased out slowly?

Will electric conversion be available for certain lighter cars that meet weight requirements?

Australia is a big place and recharge sites are way too few, thus far.

Reply Quote

Date: 13/01/2018 12:25:24
From: ChrispenEvan
ID: 1173531
Subject: re: Electrification of older cars

Tau.Neutrino said:


When is Australia going to ban fossil fuel cars and vehicles?

Will they be phased out slowly?

Will electric conversion be available for certain lighter cars that meet weight requirements?

conversions will never be a viable option.

Reply Quote

Date: 13/01/2018 12:26:07
From: Tau.Neutrino
ID: 1173532
Subject: re: Electrification of older cars

roughbarked said:


Tau.Neutrino said:

When is Australia going to ban fossil fuel cars and vehicles?

Will they be phased out slowly?

Will electric conversion be available for certain lighter cars that meet weight requirements?

Australia is a big place and recharge sites are way too few, thus far.

I have seen Tesla power chargers outside Super Cheap Auto in Ballarat.

They were put in early last year.

Reply Quote

Date: 13/01/2018 12:27:29
From: ChrispenEvan
ID: 1173533
Subject: re: Electrification of older cars

Tau.Neutrino said:


roughbarked said:

Tau.Neutrino said:

When is Australia going to ban fossil fuel cars and vehicles?

Will they be phased out slowly?

Will electric conversion be available for certain lighter cars that meet weight requirements?

Australia is a big place and recharge sites are way too few, thus far.

I have seen Tesla power chargers outside Super Cheap Auto in Ballarat.

They were put in early last year.

we have a recharged station in town.

Reply Quote

Date: 13/01/2018 12:28:45
From: Tau.Neutrino
ID: 1173534
Subject: re: Electrification of older cars

ChrispenEvan said:


Tau.Neutrino said:

When is Australia going to ban fossil fuel cars and vehicles?

Will they be phased out slowly?

Will electric conversion be available for certain lighter cars that meet weight requirements?

conversions will never be a viable option.

Im still wondering about that.

Reply Quote

Date: 13/01/2018 12:30:48
From: Tau.Neutrino
ID: 1173535
Subject: re: Electrification of older cars

mollwollfumble said:


roughbarked said:

Tau.Neutrino said:

Is the electrification of older cars viable on a large scale?

Or will it stay a custom niche industry?

Take out engine, drive lines, diff, fuel tank etc.

Replace with battery, electric drive hub wheels, new reverse cycle heating and cooling system etc.

too heavy.

Perhaps so, perhaps not. How much of a reduced range would you be prepared to put up with? 50 km?

I did a bit of work for csiro on retrofitting a Holden Commodore with batteries and an electric motor in place of a petrol engine. It can be done, but you have to fill every spare nook and cranny with batteries.

What year did you do this?

What figures would change if you did it with today’s batteries and electric motors.

Reply Quote

Date: 13/01/2018 12:31:21
From: captain_spalding
ID: 1173537
Subject: re: Electrification of older cars

roughbarked said:

Australia is a big place and recharge sites are way too few, thus far.

Once upon a time, there wasn’t a single petrol station anywhere in this country.

Reply Quote

Date: 13/01/2018 12:32:08
From: Michael V
ID: 1173539
Subject: re: Electrification of older cars

ChrispenEvan said:


Michael V said:

ChrispenEvan said:

what pollution are you concerned about?

The generation of electricity to run them.

if fossil fuel is used then there will be that pollution. thing is they are being charged by a central power source as opposed to ICE which are all run individually and therefore less efficient.

So it seems.

BOTE:

Transport uses 30-50% of the energy mix. So we’d need to roughly double the amount of electricity we generate.

Likely that’d be coal-fired.

Coal-fired power plants are more efficient than internal combustion engines. Electricity delivery loses most of that efficiency.

Single-point electricity generation concentrates pollution there.

This creates an out of sight, out of mind mentality to the thinking around electric vehicles.

Reply Quote

Date: 13/01/2018 12:32:48
From: mollwollfumble
ID: 1173540
Subject: re: Electrification of older cars

roughbarked said:


mollwollfumble said:

roughbarked said:

too heavy.

Perhaps so, perhaps not. How much of a reduced range would you be prepared to put up with? 50 km?

I did a bit of work for csiro on retrofitting a Holden Commodore with batteries and an electric motor in place of a petrol engine. It can be done, but you have to fill every spare nook and cranny with batteries.

Smarter to design a lighter car to fit the purpose.

That’s what I concluded, I was looking at how to keep the Commodore’s batteries cool, hot batteries are very bad for battery life – and Australian climate can very easily get too hot. The transmission tunnel was packed with batteries and they increased the weight of the car from 1.3 tons up to more than 2 tons.

I very much liked the Mitsubishi MiEV cars that CSIRO was also working on, but they never did let me near those.

Reply Quote

Date: 13/01/2018 12:32:49
From: ChrispenEvan
ID: 1173541
Subject: re: Electrification of older cars

captain_spalding said:


roughbarked said:

Australia is a big place and recharge sites are way too few, thus far.

Once upon a time, there wasn’t a single petrol station anywhere in this country.

yeah, they had hay stations though where you could fill up your horse.

Reply Quote

Date: 13/01/2018 12:35:46
From: ChrispenEvan
ID: 1173545
Subject: re: Electrification of older cars

Michael V said:


ChrispenEvan said:

Michael V said:

The generation of electricity to run them.

if fossil fuel is used then there will be that pollution. thing is they are being charged by a central power source as opposed to ICE which are all run individually and therefore less efficient.

So it seems.

BOTE:

Transport uses 30-50% of the energy mix. So we’d need to roughly double the amount of electricity we generate.

Likely that’d be coal-fired.

Coal-fired power plants are more efficient than internal combustion engines. Electricity delivery loses most of that efficiency.

Single-point electricity generation concentrates pollution there.

This creates an out of sight, out of mind mentality to the thinking around electric vehicles.

unlikely to be coal fired as no new plants are being proposed by the energy companies, as far as i know.

Reply Quote

Date: 13/01/2018 12:37:47
From: roughbarked
ID: 1173548
Subject: re: Electrification of older cars

Tau.Neutrino said:


ChrispenEvan said:

Tau.Neutrino said:

When is Australia going to ban fossil fuel cars and vehicles?

Will they be phased out slowly?

Will electric conversion be available for certain lighter cars that meet weight requirements?

conversions will never be a viable option.

Im still wondering about that.

Wonder all you like. The cars were engineered for completely different reasons.
If going all electrical there is a lot you can leave out of the old design. which leaves lots to think about.

Reply Quote

Date: 13/01/2018 12:38:10
From: Tau.Neutrino
ID: 1173549
Subject: re: Electrification of older cars

Will parking meters be upgraded to include electric charging stations ?

Will more electric charging stations be installed in shopping centers, free-way roadhouses etc.

Reply Quote

Date: 13/01/2018 12:38:54
From: Michael V
ID: 1173551
Subject: re: Electrification of older cars

ChrispenEvan said:


Michael V said:

ChrispenEvan said:

if fossil fuel is used then there will be that pollution. thing is they are being charged by a central power source as opposed to ICE which are all run individually and therefore less efficient.

So it seems.

BOTE:

Transport uses 30-50% of the energy mix. So we’d need to roughly double the amount of electricity we generate.

Likely that’d be coal-fired.

Coal-fired power plants are more efficient than internal combustion engines. Electricity delivery loses most of that efficiency.

Single-point electricity generation concentrates pollution there.

This creates an out of sight, out of mind mentality to the thinking around electric vehicles.

unlikely to be coal fired as no new plants are being proposed by the energy companies, as far as i know.

Then it’s unlikely we’ll get to replace our ICE transport fleet soon.

Reply Quote

Date: 13/01/2018 12:38:59
From: roughbarked
ID: 1173552
Subject: re: Electrification of older cars

captain_spalding said:


roughbarked said:

Australia is a big place and recharge sites are way too few, thus far.

Once upon a time, there wasn’t a single petrol station anywhere in this country.

Nor even a telephone booth.

Reply Quote

Date: 13/01/2018 12:39:06
From: sibeen
ID: 1173553
Subject: re: Electrification of older cars

Tau.Neutrino said:


ChrispenEvan said:

Tau.Neutrino said:

When is Australia going to ban fossil fuel cars and vehicles?

Will they be phased out slowly?

Will electric conversion be available for certain lighter cars that meet weight requirements?

conversions will never be a viable option.

Im still wondering about that.

Wonder no longer. It is a silly idea.

Reply Quote

Date: 13/01/2018 12:39:58
From: roughbarked
ID: 1173554
Subject: re: Electrification of older cars

ChrispenEvan said:


captain_spalding said:

roughbarked said:

Australia is a big place and recharge sites are way too few, thus far.

Once upon a time, there wasn’t a single petrol station anywhere in this country.

yeah, they had hay stations though where you could fill up your horse.

Spaced a day’s ride apart.

Reply Quote

Date: 13/01/2018 12:40:04
From: Tau.Neutrino
ID: 1173555
Subject: re: Electrification of older cars

roughbarked said:


Tau.Neutrino said:

ChrispenEvan said:

conversions will never be a viable option.

Im still wondering about that.

Wonder all you like. The cars were engineered for completely different reasons.
If going all electrical there is a lot you can leave out of the old design. which leaves lots to think about.

Car weights has changed over the years, they have been getting lighter ever year, what is the average weight of a car bought today?

Reply Quote

Date: 13/01/2018 12:41:17
From: roughbarked
ID: 1173556
Subject: re: Electrification of older cars

Tau.Neutrino said:


Will parking meters be upgraded to include electric charging stations ?

Will more electric charging stations be installed in shopping centers, free-way roadhouses etc.

By that time we could have developed antigravitic comedy.

Reply Quote

Date: 13/01/2018 12:44:39
From: ChrispenEvan
ID: 1173559
Subject: re: Electrification of older cars

Michael V said:


ChrispenEvan said:

Michael V said:

So it seems.

BOTE:

Transport uses 30-50% of the energy mix. So we’d need to roughly double the amount of electricity we generate.

Likely that’d be coal-fired.

Coal-fired power plants are more efficient than internal combustion engines. Electricity delivery loses most of that efficiency.

Single-point electricity generation concentrates pollution there.

This creates an out of sight, out of mind mentality to the thinking around electric vehicles.

unlikely to be coal fired as no new plants are being proposed by the energy companies, as far as i know.

Then it’s unlikely we’ll get to replace our ICE transport fleet soon.

I agree, but sooner or later it will have to happen. the transition is starting now.

Reply Quote

Date: 13/01/2018 12:52:10
From: Michael V
ID: 1173566
Subject: re: Electrification of older cars

ChrispenEvan said:


Michael V said:

ChrispenEvan said:

unlikely to be coal fired as no new plants are being proposed by the energy companies, as far as i know.

Then it’s unlikely we’ll get to replace our ICE transport fleet soon.

I agree, but sooner or later it will have to happen. the transition is starting now.

Something I’d like to see happen: Legislate big, powerful ICE motors out of motor cars. These days, 1.3 litre motors suit most people’s needs. Wants are a different matter entirely.

Reply Quote

Date: 13/01/2018 12:55:50
From: captain_spalding
ID: 1173569
Subject: re: Electrification of older cars

roughbarked said:


captain_spalding said:

roughbarked said:

Australia is a big place and recharge sites are way too few, thus far.

Once upon a time, there wasn’t a single petrol station anywhere in this country.

Nor even a telephone booth.

Telstra is working on a reversion to that state.

Reply Quote

Date: 13/01/2018 12:59:24
From: Tau.Neutrino
ID: 1173572
Subject: re: Electrification of older cars

Tesla Model S

The Tesla Model S is a full-sized all-electric five-door, luxury liftback, produced by Tesla, Inc., and introduced on 22 June 2012. It scored a perfect 5.0 NHTSA automobile safety rating. The EPA official range for the 2017 Model S 100D, which is equipped with a 100 kWh (360 MJ) battery pack, is 335 miles (540 km), higher than any other electric car. The EPA rated the 2017 90D Model S’s energy consumption at 200.9 watt-hours per kilometer (32.33 kWh/100 mi or 20.09 kWh/100 km) for a combined fuel economy of 104 miles per gallon gasoline equivalent (2.26 L/100 km or 125 mpg‑imp). In 2016, Tesla updated the design of the Model S to closely match that of the Model X. As of October 2017, the following versions are available: 75D, 100D and P100D.

Curb weight from

1,961 kg (4,323 lb) (60)

to

2,250 kg (4,960 lb) (P100D)

Battery 75, or 100 kWh lithium ion

Electric motor Front and rear motor combined output up to 779 bhp (581 kW), 920 ft⋅lb (1,250 N⋅m), 3-phase AC induction motor

Average weight of American gasoline cars today = 4,021 pounds or 1823 kg

Weight of electric Tesla model s = 1,961 kg

Reply Quote

Date: 13/01/2018 13:17:57
From: Tau.Neutrino
ID: 1173576
Subject: re: Electrification of older cars

Links

Tesla Model S
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tesla_Model_S

Average U.S. Car Is Tipping Scales At 4,000 Pounds
http://www.nytimes.com/2004/05/05/business/average-us-car-is-tipping-scales-at-4000-pounds.html

Reply Quote

Date: 13/01/2018 13:18:31
From: dv
ID: 1173577
Subject: re: Electrification of older cars

There are individuals who have made this conversion: it’s not something that is technically impossible or even especially difficult, but is it worth it (compared to the cost of buying a second hand electric vehicle)?

Reply Quote

Date: 13/01/2018 13:19:02
From: roughbarked
ID: 1173578
Subject: re: Electrification of older cars

Tau.Neutrino said:


Links

Tesla Model S
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tesla_Model_S

Average U.S. Car Is Tipping Scales At 4,000 Pounds
http://www.nytimes.com/2004/05/05/business/average-us-car-is-tipping-scales-at-4000-pounds.html

Yanks were always good at building tanks.

Reply Quote

Date: 13/01/2018 13:22:42
From: roughbarked
ID: 1173582
Subject: re: Electrification of older cars

dv said:


There are individuals who have made this conversion: it’s not something that is technically impossible or even especially difficult, but is it worth it (compared to the cost of buying a second hand electric vehicle)?

I know you asked the question and you do know the answers, for there are more than one.
Maybe a Nissan Micra is the place to start?

Reply Quote

Date: 13/01/2018 13:23:27
From: Tau.Neutrino
ID: 1173584
Subject: re: Electrification of older cars

roughbarked said:


Tau.Neutrino said:

Links

Tesla Model S
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tesla_Model_S

Average U.S. Car Is Tipping Scales At 4,000 Pounds
http://www.nytimes.com/2004/05/05/business/average-us-car-is-tipping-scales-at-4000-pounds.html

Yanks were always good at building tanks.

Have you noticed the electric car weighs more than the average gasoline car?

Reply Quote

Date: 13/01/2018 13:25:26
From: roughbarked
ID: 1173585
Subject: re: Electrification of older cars

Tau.Neutrino said:


roughbarked said:

Tau.Neutrino said:

Links

Tesla Model S
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tesla_Model_S

Average U.S. Car Is Tipping Scales At 4,000 Pounds
http://www.nytimes.com/2004/05/05/business/average-us-car-is-tipping-scales-at-4000-pounds.html

Yanks were always good at building tanks.

Have you noticed the electric car weighs more than the average gasoline car?

I think mollwoll pointed that out for you. If you start with a heavier chassis, what do you think your chances are against building a lighter stronger chassis first?

Reply Quote

Date: 13/01/2018 13:27:03
From: roughbarked
ID: 1173587
Subject: re: Electrification of older cars

roughbarked said:


Tau.Neutrino said:

roughbarked said:

Yanks were always good at building tanks.

Have you noticed the electric car weighs more than the average gasoline car?

I think mollwoll pointed that out for you. If you start with a heavier chassis, what do you think your chances are against building a lighter stronger chassis first?

Then there is the batteries, always the batteries. What’s wrong with considering an adequate condenser?

Reply Quote

Date: 13/01/2018 13:28:03
From: dv
ID: 1173589
Subject: re: Electrification of older cars

roughbarked said:


dv said:

There are individuals who have made this conversion: it’s not something that is technically impossible or even especially difficult, but is it worth it (compared to the cost of buying a second hand electric vehicle)?

I know you asked the question and you do know the answers, for there are more than one.
Maybe a Nissan Micra is the place to start?

By far the biggest selling electric vehicle in the world is the Nissan Leaf, and it seems to be pretty similar externally to the Tiida, so you might also try the Tiida.

Reply Quote

Date: 13/01/2018 13:30:24
From: roughbarked
ID: 1173591
Subject: re: Electrification of older cars

dv said:


roughbarked said:

dv said:

There are individuals who have made this conversion: it’s not something that is technically impossible or even especially difficult, but is it worth it (compared to the cost of buying a second hand electric vehicle)?

I know you asked the question and you do know the answers, for there are more than one.
Maybe a Nissan Micra is the place to start?

By far the biggest selling electric vehicle in the world is the Nissan Leaf, and it seems to be pretty similar externally to the Tiida, so you might also try the Tiida.

Yair well, who better to do it than those who used American money to build smaller lighter cars?

Reply Quote

Date: 13/01/2018 13:30:39
From: Tau.Neutrino
ID: 1173592
Subject: re: Electrification of older cars

roughbarked said:


dv said:

There are individuals who have made this conversion: it’s not something that is technically impossible or even especially difficult, but is it worth it (compared to the cost of buying a second hand electric vehicle)?

I know you asked the question and you do know the answers, for there are more than one.
Maybe a Nissan Micra is the place to start?

Yes I think there is a range that will be suitable.

and a range that will not be suitable.

The Tesla S has two electric motors, one in the front and one in the back.

Having the electric motors in the wheels would be better I would have thought.

It moves the weight of the motors further to to the ground, improving center of gravity.

4 wheel drive is another reason.

Reply Quote

Date: 13/01/2018 13:31:47
From: roughbarked
ID: 1173593
Subject: re: Electrification of older cars

Tau.Neutrino said:


roughbarked said:

dv said:

There are individuals who have made this conversion: it’s not something that is technically impossible or even especially difficult, but is it worth it (compared to the cost of buying a second hand electric vehicle)?

I know you asked the question and you do know the answers, for there are more than one.
Maybe a Nissan Micra is the place to start?

Yes I think there is a range that will be suitable.

and a range that will not be suitable.

The Tesla S has two electric motors, one in the front and one in the back.

Having the electric motors in the wheels would be better I would have thought.

It moves the weight of the motors further to to the ground, improving center of gravity.

4 wheel drive is another reason.

Speaking of wheels, there is a lot that can be done, if only we can learn how to fit it all in to the designated space.

Reply Quote

Date: 13/01/2018 13:34:20
From: dv
ID: 1173594
Subject: re: Electrification of older cars

Tau.Neutrino said:


roughbarked said:

Tau.Neutrino said:

Links

Tesla Model S
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tesla_Model_S

Average U.S. Car Is Tipping Scales At 4,000 Pounds
http://www.nytimes.com/2004/05/05/business/average-us-car-is-tipping-scales-at-4000-pounds.html

Yanks were always good at building tanks.

Have you noticed the electric car weighs more than the average gasoline car?

The Model S is a luxury car, not comparable to a normal commuter vehicle.

The Nissan Leaf has a curb weight of 1538 kg. Admittedly this is about 300 kg more than the Tiida. 220 kg of that is the battery!

You’d think (and I haven’t checked this out) that it would be easier to convert a hybrid to a plug-in electric than an ICE to a plug-in electic, since the hybrid already has the electric drive train … right?

Reply Quote

Date: 13/01/2018 13:36:05
From: roughbarked
ID: 1173595
Subject: re: Electrification of older cars

roughbarked said:

Speaking of wheels, there is a lot that can be done, if only we can learn how to fit it all in to the designated space.

This was made in 1920 by Jaeger Le-Coultre.

Here it is, in a case of diamonds, each almost bigger than it.

The movement is so small it is almost novelty worthy. It is 14mm long, 4.8mm wide, and 3.4mm thick. Really little and it weights around a gram. Still a good part of the movement is done in gray gold which is not exactly light – there is just not that much material here.

Reply Quote

Date: 13/01/2018 13:36:55
From: Tau.Neutrino
ID: 1173596
Subject: re: Electrification of older cars

roughbarked said:


Tau.Neutrino said:

roughbarked said:

I know you asked the question and you do know the answers, for there are more than one.
Maybe a Nissan Micra is the place to start?

Yes I think there is a range that will be suitable.

and a range that will not be suitable.

The Tesla S has two electric motors, one in the front and one in the back.

Having the electric motors in the wheels would be better I would have thought.

It moves the weight of the motors further to to the ground, improving center of gravity.

4 wheel drive is another reason.

Speaking of wheels, there is a lot that can be done, if only we can learn how to fit it all in to the designated space.

Like 3D printing cheap but strong carbon fiber side panels, doors, boot lids and bonnets etc

That could bring the overall weight of older cars down to something more acceptable.

Reply Quote

Date: 13/01/2018 13:37:51
From: roughbarked
ID: 1173597
Subject: re: Electrification of older cars

Reply Quote

Date: 13/01/2018 13:39:24
From: roughbarked
ID: 1173598
Subject: re: Electrification of older cars

Tau.Neutrino said:


roughbarked said:

Tau.Neutrino said:

Yes I think there is a range that will be suitable.

and a range that will not be suitable.

The Tesla S has two electric motors, one in the front and one in the back.

Having the electric motors in the wheels would be better I would have thought.

It moves the weight of the motors further to to the ground, improving center of gravity.

4 wheel drive is another reason.

Speaking of wheels, there is a lot that can be done, if only we can learn how to fit it all in to the designated space.

Like 3D printing cheap but strong carbon fiber side panels, doors, boot lids and bonnets etc

That could bring the overall weight of older cars down to something more acceptable.

I can assure you that weight is almost everything next to needing streamlining. Powerful electric motors exist but they aren’t light.

Reply Quote

Date: 13/01/2018 13:40:19
From: roughbarked
ID: 1173599
Subject: re: Electrification of older cars

roughbarked said:


Tau.Neutrino said:

roughbarked said:

Speaking of wheels, there is a lot that can be done, if only we can learn how to fit it all in to the designated space.

Like 3D printing cheap but strong carbon fiber side panels, doors, boot lids and bonnets etc

That could bring the overall weight of older cars down to something more acceptable.

I can assure you that weight is almost everything next to needing streamlining. Powerful electric motors exist but they aren’t light.

Light electric motors exist but they cannot push a bit of fluff from your camera case when unfolding the lens.

Reply Quote

Date: 13/01/2018 13:40:50
From: dv
ID: 1173600
Subject: re: Electrification of older cars

Not only could rechargeable zinc-based batteries possibly store as much energy as lithium-ion batteries, they could also be safer, cheaper, smaller and lighter, new research finds. The results suggest zinc batteries could find use in mild hybrids (microhybrids), electric vehicles, electric bicycles, and eventually, perhaps smartphones and power grid storage.
https://spectrum.ieee.org/energywise/transportation/advanced-cars/zincbased-batteries-can-provide-more-energy-safety-than-liion

Reply Quote

Date: 13/01/2018 13:42:41
From: Tau.Neutrino
ID: 1173601
Subject: re: Electrification of older cars

What what be the weight of a small car sold in Australia today

Then what would be the weight without engine, drive, fuel tank, etc

vs the weight of putting in a new battery and new electric motors

Reply Quote

Date: 13/01/2018 13:44:10
From: Witty Rejoinder
ID: 1173602
Subject: re: Electrification of older cars

dv said:


Not only could rechargeable zinc-based batteries possibly store as much energy as lithium-ion batteries, they could also be safer, cheaper, smaller and lighter, new research finds. The results suggest zinc batteries could find use in mild hybrids (microhybrids), electric vehicles, electric bicycles, and eventually, perhaps smartphones and power grid storage.
https://spectrum.ieee.org/energywise/transportation/advanced-cars/zincbased-batteries-can-provide-more-energy-safety-than-liion

fap fap fap

Reply Quote

Date: 13/01/2018 13:45:32
From: Tau.Neutrino
ID: 1173603
Subject: re: Electrification of older cars

What about laws that allow for car body weights of new gasoline cars and electric cars to be the same, is that possible?

Then a transition period could be made easier.

Reply Quote

Date: 13/01/2018 13:46:04
From: dv
ID: 1173604
Subject: re: Electrification of older cars

Witty Rejoinder said:


dv said:

Not only could rechargeable zinc-based batteries possibly store as much energy as lithium-ion batteries, they could also be safer, cheaper, smaller and lighter, new research finds. The results suggest zinc batteries could find use in mild hybrids (microhybrids), electric vehicles, electric bicycles, and eventually, perhaps smartphones and power grid storage.
https://spectrum.ieee.org/energywise/transportation/advanced-cars/zincbased-batteries-can-provide-more-energy-safety-than-liion

fap fap fap

Cruel but fair

Reply Quote

Date: 13/01/2018 13:46:52
From: dv
ID: 1173605
Subject: re: Electrification of older cars

Tau.Neutrino said:


What about laws that allow for car body weights of new gasoline cars and electric cars to be the same, is that possible?

Then a transition period could be made easier.

How would you frame this law? At the moment there is a great range in body weights for petrol cars and for electric cars.

Reply Quote

Date: 13/01/2018 13:47:52
From: roughbarked
ID: 1173606
Subject: re: Electrification of older cars

In a wristwatch, one may get from a year to three from a silver oxide battery. Depending on usage, up to 10 years from a lithium. The condensers used in the ecodrive and the kinetic, last almost indefinitely are no heavier. One is powered by light, the other kinetic transfer.

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Date: 13/01/2018 13:49:17
From: Peak Warming Man
ID: 1173607
Subject: re: Electrification of older cars

Reckon there’s going to be a lot of Nissan Leafs pulling a Chesney parked beside the road all the way up to Cunningham’s Gap.

Reply Quote

Date: 13/01/2018 13:49:38
From: roughbarked
ID: 1173608
Subject: re: Electrification of older cars

roughbarked said:


In a wristwatch, one may get from a year to three from a silver oxide battery. Depending on usage, up to 10 years from a lithium. The condensers used in the ecodrive and the kinetic, last almost indefinitely are no heavier. One is powered by light, the other kinetic transfer.

infinitively?

Anyway, the companies say never have to change a battery again. Which isn’t innacurate for the watch in effect, doesn’t have a battery.
Reply Quote

Date: 13/01/2018 13:49:46
From: Tau.Neutrino
ID: 1173609
Subject: re: Electrification of older cars

dv said:


Tau.Neutrino said:

What about laws that allow for car body weights of new gasoline cars and electric cars to be the same, is that possible?

Then a transition period could be made easier.

How would you frame this law? At the moment there is a great range in body weights for petrol cars and for electric cars.

You could make it scalable for weight ranges, light vehicles, medium and heavy.

Reply Quote

Date: 13/01/2018 13:50:13
From: roughbarked
ID: 1173610
Subject: re: Electrification of older cars

Peak Warming Man said:


Reckon there’s going to be a lot of Nissan Leafs pulling a Chesney parked beside the road all the way up to Cunningham’s Gap.

Heh. Yair to be fair, there is a long way to go yet.

Reply Quote

Date: 13/01/2018 13:50:40
From: dv
ID: 1173611
Subject: re: Electrification of older cars

What is a Chesney?

Reply Quote

Date: 13/01/2018 13:51:05
From: roughbarked
ID: 1173612
Subject: re: Electrification of older cars

Tau.Neutrino said:


dv said:

Tau.Neutrino said:

What about laws that allow for car body weights of new gasoline cars and electric cars to be the same, is that possible?

Then a transition period could be made easier.

How would you frame this law? At the moment there is a great range in body weights for petrol cars and for electric cars.

You could make it scalable for weight ranges, light vehicles, medium and heavy.

Such laws already exist, in physics.

Reply Quote

Date: 13/01/2018 13:52:40
From: roughbarked
ID: 1173613
Subject: re: Electrification of older cars

dv said:


What is a Chesney?

Here’s google brain asking a question of us?

I dunno either.

Reply Quote

Date: 13/01/2018 13:53:30
From: dv
ID: 1173614
Subject: re: Electrification of older cars

roughbarked said:


dv said:

What is a Chesney?

Here’s google brain asking a question of us?

I dunno either.

most flattering

Reply Quote

Date: 13/01/2018 13:53:34
From: Peak Warming Man
ID: 1173615
Subject: re: Electrification of older cars

Reply Quote

Date: 13/01/2018 13:54:18
From: roughbarked
ID: 1173616
Subject: re: Electrification of older cars

roughbarked said:


dv said:

What is a Chesney?

Here’s google brain asking a question of us?

I dunno either.

?

Reply Quote

Date: 13/01/2018 13:55:06
From: Tau.Neutrino
ID: 1173617
Subject: re: Electrification of older cars

I think people buying petrol cars in the years before banning petrol etc should be able to swap over to all electric

pass laws requiring petrol and electric cars to have the same weight car bodies

this would be for the near future

Reply Quote

Date: 13/01/2018 13:56:47
From: Michael V
ID: 1173618
Subject: re: Electrification of older cars

dv said:


Not only could rechargeable zinc-based batteries possibly store as much energy as lithium-ion batteries, they could also be safer, cheaper, smaller and lighter, new research finds. The results suggest zinc batteries could find use in mild hybrids (microhybrids), electric vehicles, electric bicycles, and eventually, perhaps smartphones and power grid storage.
https://spectrum.ieee.org/energywise/transportation/advanced-cars/zincbased-batteries-can-provide-more-energy-safety-than-liion
Back to being a stooge for the zinc industry again?

;)

Reply Quote

Date: 13/01/2018 13:56:53
From: roughbarked
ID: 1173619
Subject: re: Electrification of older cars

Tau.Neutrino said:

I think people buying petrol cars in the years before banning petrol etc should be able to swap over to all electric

pass laws requiring petrol and electric cars to have the same weight car bodies

this would be for the near future

Far cheaper to simply scrap the old cars and build new ones.

Reply Quote

Date: 13/01/2018 14:00:02
From: Michael V
ID: 1173620
Subject: re: Electrification of older cars

dv said:


What is a Chesney?
Something that should have been banned years ago. A caravan.

Reply Quote

Date: 13/01/2018 14:01:01
From: Tau.Neutrino
ID: 1173621
Subject: re: Electrification of older cars

roughbarked said:


Tau.Neutrino said:

I think people buying petrol cars in the years before banning petrol etc should be able to swap over to all electric

pass laws requiring petrol and electric cars to have the same weight car bodies

this would be for the near future

Far cheaper to simply scrap the old cars and build new ones.

So everyone has to buy a new car?

What will happen to the millions of car already on the road?

Will people be allowed to convert existing cars?

When will people be no longer allowed to buy petrol?

etc

Reply Quote

Date: 13/01/2018 14:01:18
From: roughbarked
ID: 1173622
Subject: re: Electrification of older cars

Michael V said:


dv said:

What is a Chesney?
Something that should have been banned years ago. A caravan.

They turn to what looks like bits of torn cardboad when they hit something.

Reply Quote

Date: 13/01/2018 14:02:42
From: roughbarked
ID: 1173623
Subject: re: Electrification of older cars

Tau.Neutrino said:


roughbarked said:

Tau.Neutrino said:

I think people buying petrol cars in the years before banning petrol etc should be able to swap over to all electric

pass laws requiring petrol and electric cars to have the same weight car bodies

this would be for the near future

Far cheaper to simply scrap the old cars and build new ones.

So everyone has to buy a new car?

What will happen to the millions of car already on the road?

Will people be allowed to convert existing cars?

When will people be no longer allowed to buy petrol?

etc

What has been happening all along is that some people make a living out of scrapping old cars because that’s aboput all that can be done with them.

Reply Quote

Date: 13/01/2018 14:03:46
From: dv
ID: 1173624
Subject: re: Electrification of older cars

Michael V said:


dv said:

Not only could rechargeable zinc-based batteries possibly store as much energy as lithium-ion batteries, they could also be safer, cheaper, smaller and lighter, new research finds. The results suggest zinc batteries could find use in mild hybrids (microhybrids), electric vehicles, electric bicycles, and eventually, perhaps smartphones and power grid storage.
https://spectrum.ieee.org/energywise/transportation/advanced-cars/zincbased-batteries-can-provide-more-energy-safety-than-liion
Back to being a stooge for the zinc industry again?

;)

Damn straight.

There is not enough known lithium reserves for the world to switch to Li-ion cars and power storage, but we’ve got zinc up the wazoo. Literally in some cases.

Reply Quote

Date: 13/01/2018 14:04:15
From: roughbarked
ID: 1173625
Subject: re: Electrification of older cars

Tau.Neutrino said:

When will people be no longer allowed to buy petrol?

When there isn’t enough to go around.

Reply Quote

Date: 13/01/2018 14:05:39
From: roughbarked
ID: 1173626
Subject: re: Electrification of older cars

dv said:


Michael V said:

dv said:

Not only could rechargeable zinc-based batteries possibly store as much energy as lithium-ion batteries, they could also be safer, cheaper, smaller and lighter, new research finds. The results suggest zinc batteries could find use in mild hybrids (microhybrids), electric vehicles, electric bicycles, and eventually, perhaps smartphones and power grid storage.
https://spectrum.ieee.org/energywise/transportation/advanced-cars/zincbased-batteries-can-provide-more-energy-safety-than-liion
Back to being a stooge for the zinc industry again?

;)

Damn straight.

There is not enough known lithium reserves for the world to switch to Li-ion cars and power storage, but we’ve got zinc up the wazoo. Literally in some cases.

Surely there are also other possibilities other than only zinc?

Reply Quote

Date: 13/01/2018 14:06:25
From: Tau.Neutrino
ID: 1173627
Subject: re: Electrification of older cars

roughbarked said:

Tau.Neutrino said:

When will people be no longer allowed to buy petrol?

When there isn’t enough to go around.

I was wondering what will happen with people who own vintage cars?

and racing car drivers etc

Reply Quote

Date: 13/01/2018 14:07:28
From: transition
ID: 1173628
Subject: re: Electrification of older cars

>When will people be no longer allowed to buy petrol?

there will always be petrol, diesel, oil, kero, engines of various sorts using those as fuel.

there are trucks, trains, big boats, planes, and all those stationary engines

much as the thread is about conversion of cars, it’s a bit car focused, to the point of distortion, of the bigger picture, which makes sense given the power of the car in ideology.

Reply Quote

Date: 13/01/2018 14:08:11
From: transition
ID: 1173629
Subject: re: Electrification of older cars

transition said:


>When will people be no longer allowed to buy petrol?

there will always be petrol, diesel, oil, kero, engines of various sorts using those as fuel.

there are trucks, trains, big boats, planes, and all those stationary engines

much as the thread is about conversion of cars, it’s a bit car focused, to the point of distortion, of the bigger picture, which makes sense given the power of the car in ideology.

and not forgetting gas, of course

Reply Quote

Date: 13/01/2018 14:24:40
From: party_pants
ID: 1173635
Subject: re: Electrification of older cars

Old cars tend to get recycled pretty much completely. It would not be such a waste as you might think if they were phased out.

Reply Quote

Date: 13/01/2018 14:27:05
From: transition
ID: 1173637
Subject: re: Electrification of older cars

party_pants said:


Old cars tend to get recycled pretty much completely. It would not be such a waste as you might think if they were phased out.

I think the piston engine, like towing a caravan, has as much chance of disappearing completely as all those jets flying overhead.

Reply Quote

Date: 13/01/2018 14:31:16
From: captain_spalding
ID: 1173640
Subject: re: Electrification of older cars

Tau.Neutrino said:

When will people peasants be no longer allowed to buy petrol?

Reply Quote

Date: 13/01/2018 14:46:52
From: dv
ID: 1173649
Subject: re: Electrification of older cars

roughbarked said:


dv said:

Michael V said:

Back to being a stooge for the zinc industry again?

;)

Damn straight.

There is not enough known lithium reserves for the world to switch to Li-ion cars and power storage, but we’ve got zinc up the wazoo. Literally in some cases.

Surely there are also other possibilities other than only zinc?

I suppose that’s possible…

Reply Quote

Date: 13/01/2018 14:53:07
From: The Rev Dodgson
ID: 1173655
Subject: re: Electrification of older cars

Regarding pollution from electricity generation for running electric cars:

1) Since cars run for a short period of the day, usually at known times, they can be charged at times of minimum demand, when all or most of the electricity will come from low pollution sources such as wind and solar.

2) Electric cars can be optimised to run more efficiently than ICE cars.

3) When everyone has an electric car this will be a huge additional storage facility, that will allow greater use of wind and solar etc.

For these reasons switching to electric cars is (or should be) an essential part of GHG emissions reduction strategy.

Reply Quote

Date: 13/01/2018 15:00:31
From: dv
ID: 1173659
Subject: re: Electrification of older cars

The Rev Dodgson said:


Regarding pollution from electricity generation for running electric cars:

1) Since cars run for a short period of the day, usually at known times, they can be charged at times of minimum demand, when all or most of the electricity will come from low pollution sources such as wind and solar.

2) Electric cars can be optimised to run more efficiently than ICE cars.

3) When everyone has an electric car this will be a huge additional storage facility, that will allow greater use of wind and solar etc.

For these reasons switching to electric cars is (or should be) an essential part of GHG emissions reduction strategy.

There are other advantages unrelated to GHG, in reducing urban pollution. Ozone pollution, nitrogen oxide, nitrogen dioxide, particulates, carbon monoxide etc.

Reply Quote

Date: 13/01/2018 15:09:52
From: sibeen
ID: 1173661
Subject: re: Electrification of older cars

The Rev Dodgson said:

3) When everyone has an electric car this will be a huge additional storage facility, that will allow greater use of wind and solar etc.

It’s a very good idea and one that has been around for a long time, I first heard it at a tech presentation nearly 30 years ago. The issue is that hardly anyone is setting up the charging facilities within the vehicles to do anything of the sort.

Reply Quote

Date: 13/01/2018 15:20:35
From: The Rev Dodgson
ID: 1173669
Subject: re: Electrification of older cars

sibeen said:


The Rev Dodgson said:

3) When everyone has an electric car this will be a huge additional storage facility, that will allow greater use of wind and solar etc.

It’s a very good idea and one that has been around for a long time, I first heard it at a tech presentation nearly 30 years ago. The issue is that hardly anyone is setting up the charging facilities within the vehicles to do anything of the sort.

Surely we just need to get that Musk bloke to mutter he’s doing it, and the World will follow.

Reply Quote

Date: 13/01/2018 15:21:04
From: Michael V
ID: 1173670
Subject: re: Electrification of older cars

sibeen said:


The Rev Dodgson said:

3) When everyone has an electric car this will be a huge additional storage facility, that will allow greater use of wind and solar etc.

It’s a very good idea and one that has been around for a long time, I first heard it at a tech presentation nearly 30 years ago. The issue is that hardly anyone is setting up the charging facilities within the vehicles to do anything of the sort.

I realise that this is a technical issue about which I wouldn’t have a clue, but I’m going to ask the questions anyway. What’s needed and why? How would you go about making that happen? Would it be possible to retrofit the stuff?

Reply Quote

Date: 13/01/2018 15:25:50
From: transition
ID: 1173671
Subject: re: Electrification of older cars

Michael V said:


sibeen said:

The Rev Dodgson said:

3) When everyone has an electric car this will be a huge additional storage facility, that will allow greater use of wind and solar etc.

It’s a very good idea and one that has been around for a long time, I first heard it at a tech presentation nearly 30 years ago. The issue is that hardly anyone is setting up the charging facilities within the vehicles to do anything of the sort.

I realise that this is a technical issue about which I wouldn’t have a clue, but I’m going to ask the questions anyway. What’s needed and why? How would you go about making that happen? Would it be possible to retrofit the stuff?

nobody mentions much about recombination losses re batteries, what are they, of modern lithium, or expected to be of next generation zinc, and surely it varies too depending if fast charged or not, and I guess lots of people will be wanting a fast charge.

dunno, just seems to be an invisible aspect of of battery reality, contrary to the idealizations, obliviated so, perhaps

Reply Quote

Date: 13/01/2018 15:26:37
From: The Rev Dodgson
ID: 1173673
Subject: re: Electrification of older cars

Michael V said:


sibeen said:

The Rev Dodgson said:

3) When everyone has an electric car this will be a huge additional storage facility, that will allow greater use of wind and solar etc.

It’s a very good idea and one that has been around for a long time, I first heard it at a tech presentation nearly 30 years ago. The issue is that hardly anyone is setting up the charging facilities within the vehicles to do anything of the sort.

I realise that this is a technical issue about which I wouldn’t have a clue, but I’m going to ask the questions anyway. What’s needed and why? How would you go about making that happen? Would it be possible to retrofit the stuff?

Answering a technical question about which I also don’t have a clue, if solar panels can be set up to feed either the house supply or back into the grid, surely a battery can be set up as a two-way device as well.

Reply Quote

Date: 13/01/2018 15:31:11
From: Woodie
ID: 1173681
Subject: re: Electrification of older cars

The Rev Dodgson said:

Answering a technical question about which I also don’t have a clue, if solar panels can be set up to feed either the house supply or back into the grid, surely a battery can be set up as a two-way device as well.

Reply Quote

Date: 13/01/2018 15:31:31
From: sibeen
ID: 1173683
Subject: re: Electrification of older cars

Michael V said:


sibeen said:

The Rev Dodgson said:

3) When everyone has an electric car this will be a huge additional storage facility, that will allow greater use of wind and solar etc.

It’s a very good idea and one that has been around for a long time, I first heard it at a tech presentation nearly 30 years ago. The issue is that hardly anyone is setting up the charging facilities within the vehicles to do anything of the sort.

I realise that this is a technical issue about which I wouldn’t have a clue, but I’m going to ask the questions anyway. What’s needed and why? How would you go about making that happen? Would it be possible to retrofit the stuff?

At the moment the chargers that are built into most vehicles are a charge only unit. They cannot take the charge from the battery and return it to the grid. This requires a bi-directional converter. That’s not that big a deal, and wouldn’t add that much cost. It’s probably harder on the control side, although nothing insurmountable. Would require communication options so that vehicles know when to take a charge from the grid when there is excess solar/wind etc, and knowing when to decide that the grid needs some help and therefore to pump back into the grid. Standards and protocols would need to be developed, but no biggy.

One hump is going to be the car manufacturers. If the battery in the vehicle is being used constantly in a charge/recharge/charge mode it will considerably shorten the life of the battery with the current technological restraints. Perhaps big zinc will cone to the rescue with a technology that offers a far superior number of charge/discharge cycles.

Reply Quote

Date: 13/01/2018 15:45:33
From: PermeateFree
ID: 1173697
Subject: re: Electrification of older cars

I read it as a new way of getting rid of older cats.

Reply Quote

Date: 13/01/2018 16:22:46
From: Michael V
ID: 1173710
Subject: re: Electrification of older cars

sibeen said:


Michael V said:

sibeen said:

It’s a very good idea and one that has been around for a long time, I first heard it at a tech presentation nearly 30 years ago. The issue is that hardly anyone is setting up the charging facilities within the vehicles to do anything of the sort.

I realise that this is a technical issue about which I wouldn’t have a clue, but I’m going to ask the questions anyway. What’s needed and why? How would you go about making that happen? Would it be possible to retrofit the stuff?

At the moment the chargers that are built into most vehicles are a charge only unit. They cannot take the charge from the battery and return it to the grid. This requires a bi-directional converter. That’s not that big a deal, and wouldn’t add that much cost. It’s probably harder on the control side, although nothing insurmountable. Would require communication options so that vehicles know when to take a charge from the grid when there is excess solar/wind etc, and knowing when to decide that the grid needs some help and therefore to pump back into the grid. Standards and protocols would need to be developed, but no biggy.

One hump is going to be the car manufacturers. If the battery in the vehicle is being used constantly in a charge/recharge/charge mode it will considerably shorten the life of the battery with the current technological restraints. Perhaps big zinc will cone to the rescue with a technology that offers a far superior number of charge/discharge cycles.

Thanks.

Reply Quote

Date: 13/01/2018 19:31:32
From: mollwollfumble
ID: 1173827
Subject: re: Electrification of older cars

captain_spalding said:


Tau.Neutrino said:

When will people peasants be no longer allowed to buy petrol?

2040 or thereabouts, ditto LPG.
Diesel, methane and ethanol fuel longer, perhaps another 10 or 20 years.

Reply Quote

Date: 13/01/2018 23:47:38
From: Tau.Neutrino
ID: 1173981
Subject: re: Electrification of older cars

Parking meters that are upgraded to be power stations as well will be double $$ earners for local governments.

Reply Quote

Date: 14/01/2018 00:11:20
From: Rule 303
ID: 1173986
Subject: re: Electrification of older cars

There is the aging of the rest of the object to consider, with attendant increasing maintenance / repair costs. The other systems need to be considered, too: Even a vehicle that’s only ten years old is a looooong way behind the current standard for safety, comfort, technology, design trends etc.

And what happens when it crashes / corrodes / burns / ages / wears out / falls into a waterway / leaks / breaks down? How much testing is required? Does every vehicle require an engineer’s report and special registration and insurance?

This might seem like a good idea, but I suspect the world will have questions it can’t answer.

Reply Quote

Date: 14/01/2018 21:54:37
From: Ian
ID: 1174438
Subject: re: Electrification of older cars

Q: How much will it cost me to convert my car to electricity?

A: Using a standard DC system & components with average performance, you can expect to pay between $3000 and $6000 US. The price varies substantially depending on how fast and far you wish to drive. Some have converted cars for under $1000 US by using second-hand parts.

Q: How far can I drive in an EV?

A: Range is limited by budget. While a typical conversion may offer 60 miles on a charge, you will generally never get beyond 100 miles (160 km) using Lead-Acid batteries. The larger the Lead Acid battery pack the heavier it gets until the weight of the battery pack reaches the car’s limitations.

If you can afford Lithium batteries coupled with an AC system, range can be anywhere from 100 to 400 miles. Lithium batteries are not cheap however. A typical set with about 200 miles range might cost upwards of $20,000 US.

When calculating range, it may be helpful to consider that approximately 9.5KwHrs of usable battery capacity is approximately equal to 1 gallon of gas in the same car at the same gross weight (based on real-world observations of builders on this forum). That works fine for the “first gallon,” because there are weight savings on the engine and associated components, but since batteries weigh between 30-70 times more than gasoline (in 2011, subject to change) you will quickly find your gross weight exceeded when adding a bigger “tank.” Also, don’t forget that other factors (Peukert effect; maximum safe discharge levels; maximum “c” discharge rates) can further degrade the theoretical range of your pack.

http://www.diyelectriccar.com/forums/showthread.php/frequently-asked-questions-5119.html

Reply Quote

Date: 14/01/2018 22:47:49
From: Michael V
ID: 1174474
Subject: re: Electrification of older cars

Ian said:


Q: How much will it cost me to convert my car to electricity?

A: Using a standard DC system & components with average performance, you can expect to pay between $3000 and $6000 US. The price varies substantially depending on how fast and far you wish to drive. Some have converted cars for under $1000 US by using second-hand parts.

Q: How far can I drive in an EV?

A: Range is limited by budget. While a typical conversion may offer 60 miles on a charge, you will generally never get beyond 100 miles (160 km) using Lead-Acid batteries. The larger the Lead Acid battery pack the heavier it gets until the weight of the battery pack reaches the car’s limitations.

If you can afford Lithium batteries coupled with an AC system, range can be anywhere from 100 to 400 miles. Lithium batteries are not cheap however. A typical set with about 200 miles range might cost upwards of $20,000 US.

When calculating range, it may be helpful to consider that approximately 9.5KwHrs of usable battery capacity is approximately equal to 1 gallon of gas in the same car at the same gross weight (based on real-world observations of builders on this forum). That works fine for the “first gallon,” because there are weight savings on the engine and associated components, but since batteries weigh between 30-70 times more than gasoline (in 2011, subject to change) you will quickly find your gross weight exceeded when adding a bigger “tank.” Also, don’t forget that other factors (Peukert effect; maximum safe discharge levels; maximum “c” discharge rates) can further degrade the theoretical range of your pack.

http://www.diyelectriccar.com/forums/showthread.php/frequently-asked-questions-5119.html

Good on you for finding that for Mr Neutrino. I hope he reads that site in full, and then gives us a complete precis. I’m hoping motorbikes might be included, but www.diyelectriccar.com kind of suggests it might not.

:(

Reply Quote

Date: 15/01/2018 00:06:07
From: transition
ID: 1174483
Subject: re: Electrification of older cars

>Good on you for finding that for Mr Neutrino. I hope he reads that site in full, and then gives us a complete precis. I’m hoping motorbikes might be included, but www.diyelectriccar.com kind of suggests it might not. :(

i’ve seen video of them really going at the speedway :)

impressed I was.

so if the shop’s ~1/4mile there and back, and you’re in a big hurry, should be a fun trip

Reply Quote

Date: 15/01/2018 00:16:21
From: transition
ID: 1174484
Subject: re: Electrification of older cars

not kept up with electric motorbikes at all, so went had look at some youtube of this

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lightning_LS-218
The Lightning LS-218 is an electric motorcycle produced in the United States by Lightning Motorcycle since 2014.
It took first place among all motorcycles, gas and electric, at the 2013 Pikes Peak International Hill Climb. The manufacturer claims a top speed of 218 mph (351 km/h)…

…The standard battery pack’s capacity is 12 kWh (43 MJ). Range with an optional 20 kWh battery pack is claimed 160–180 miles (257-290 km)”

Reply Quote

Date: 15/01/2018 00:26:46
From: Michael V
ID: 1174487
Subject: re: Electrification of older cars

transition said:


not kept up with electric motorbikes at all, so went had look at some youtube of this

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lightning_LS-218
The Lightning LS-218 is an electric motorcycle produced in the United States by Lightning Motorcycle since 2014.
It took first place among all motorcycles, gas and electric, at the 2013 Pikes Peak International Hill Climb. The manufacturer claims a top speed of 218 mph (351 km/h)…

…The standard battery pack’s capacity is 12 kWh (43 MJ). Range with an optional 20 kWh battery pack is claimed 160–180 miles (257-290 km)”

:)

They are getting there.

Reply Quote

Date: 15/01/2018 08:47:15
From: AwesomeO
ID: 1174553
Subject: re: Electrification of older cars

I am a Eco warrior, I use an electric vehicle about once a week.

Reply Quote

Date: 15/01/2018 08:49:05
From: roughbarked
ID: 1174556
Subject: re: Electrification of older cars

AwesomeO said:


I am a Eco warrior, I use an electric vehicle about once a week.

Do you use it on the roads?

Reply Quote

Date: 15/01/2018 08:49:39
From: buffy
ID: 1174557
Subject: re: Electrification of older cars

AwesomeO said:


I am a Eco warrior, I use an electric vehicle about once a week.

We were talking to a doctor friend/patient/colleague yesterday. She is taking some of my practice furniture for her new practice in Casterton. She is putting a gopher park outside the front door. And rails on the ramp so you can’t bring your gopher up the ramp onto the verandah…and subsequently fall off. She considered buying my house for her practice, but found one with a better layout. She has beautiful pressed tin ceilings in two of her consulting rooms. I am jealous of that.

Reply Quote

Date: 15/01/2018 08:50:25
From: AwesomeO
ID: 1174558
Subject: re: Electrification of older cars

roughbarked said:


AwesomeO said:

I am a Eco warrior, I use an electric vehicle about once a week.

Do you use it on the roads?

Yep, till I get to town then then footpath.

Reply Quote

Date: 15/01/2018 08:51:54
From: buffy
ID: 1174559
Subject: re: Electrification of older cars

AwesomeO said:


roughbarked said:

AwesomeO said:

I am a Eco warrior, I use an electric vehicle about once a week.

Do you use it on the roads?

Yep, till I get to town then then footpath.

Have you got the flag on the pole thing?

Reply Quote

Date: 15/01/2018 08:53:39
From: roughbarked
ID: 1174561
Subject: re: Electrification of older cars

AwesomeO said:


roughbarked said:

AwesomeO said:

I am a Eco warrior, I use an electric vehicle about once a week.

Do you use it on the roads?

Yep, till I get to town then then footpath.

Not paying any road tax then?

Reply Quote

Date: 15/01/2018 08:54:35
From: AwesomeO
ID: 1174562
Subject: re: Electrification of older cars

buffy said:


AwesomeO said:

roughbarked said:

Do you use it on the roads?

Yep, till I get to town then then footpath.

Have you got the flag on the pole thing?

It’s a scooter not a gopher, e200 razor.

Reply Quote

Date: 15/01/2018 08:58:17
From: AwesomeO
ID: 1174564
Subject: re: Electrification of older cars

Reply Quote

Date: 15/01/2018 08:59:38
From: buffy
ID: 1174565
Subject: re: Electrification of older cars

AwesomeO said:



Ooh, you groovy thing!

Reply Quote

Date: 15/01/2018 09:05:48
From: AwesomeO
ID: 1174566
Subject: re: Electrification of older cars

buffy said:


AwesomeO said:


Ooh, you groovy thing!

Scooter is my nickname at the pub. Everyone has a nickname.

Reply Quote

Date: 16/02/2018 01:23:35
From: boppa
ID: 1188847
Subject: re: Electrification of older cars

Pops in, havent posted here for ages, I was googling and this thread came up (sorry about the necro btw)
Its interesting how wrong many people are about electric conversions- I know of several, one was up near where D.O. and I used to be
Hilux ute, 200km range, acceleration double the factory diesel with a top speed almost 30kmh paster than the IC motor and still has a full 1 tonne capacity (and often tows a trailer with another tonne on it)- all run purely off solar panels
Cost about $30g

One thing is that in Qld at least, full chassis cars (meaning a ute) is basically the only thing you can use as you conversion easily due to regs about rollover, the batterys must remain attached and contained- much easier to do in a full chassis design than a normal car
If a 4 door was required a hilux or other brand crewcab ute would be a good starting point

http://www.thebackshed.com/basiclynatural/EVConversion.asp

Reply Quote

Date: 16/02/2018 02:49:08
From: mollwollfumble
ID: 1188849
Subject: re: Electrification of older cars

boppa said:


Pops in, havent posted here for ages, I was googling and this thread came up (sorry about the necro btw)
Its interesting how wrong many people are about electric conversions- I know of several, one was up near where D.O. and I used to be
Hilux ute, 200km range, acceleration double the factory diesel with a top speed almost 30kmh paster than the IC motor and still has a full 1 tonne capacity (and often tows a trailer with another tonne on it)- all run purely off solar panels
Cost about $30g

One thing is that in Qld at least, full chassis cars (meaning a ute) is basically the only thing you can use as you conversion easily due to regs about rollover, the batterys must remain attached and contained- much easier to do in a full chassis design than a normal car
If a 4 door was required a hilux or other brand crewcab ute would be a good starting point

http://www.thebackshed.com/basiclynatural/EVConversion.asp


I never thought of electrifying a ute. Given the very large mass and volume of the batteries needed, that makes perfect sense.

Reply Quote

Date: 16/02/2018 04:52:20
From: boppa
ID: 1188851
Subject: re: Electrification of older cars

Actually using liions, they only come to about 300kg in Trevs ute
We recently put exactly the same brand into our ute for running the fridge etc, instead of weighing in at nearly 30kg for the two 90ah deepcycle l/a, the new ones weigh 7kg- and actually have more running time by nearly 12 hrs!
Not that much more expensive than deepcycles either, was 600 for the two l/a, 800 for the liions

Reply Quote

Date: 16/02/2018 05:03:59
From: boppa
ID: 1188852
Subject: re: Electrification of older cars

if you look at the link,the batterys arent that large either- in the pic I posted, they are in the aluminum box just behind the cab of the ute

Reply Quote

Date: 16/02/2018 06:55:41
From: roughbarked
ID: 1188861
Subject: re: Electrification of older cars

mollwollfumble said:


boppa said:

Pops in, havent posted here for ages, I was googling and this thread came up (sorry about the necro btw)
Its interesting how wrong many people are about electric conversions- I know of several, one was up near where D.O. and I used to be
Hilux ute, 200km range, acceleration double the factory diesel with a top speed almost 30kmh paster than the IC motor and still has a full 1 tonne capacity (and often tows a trailer with another tonne on it)- all run purely off solar panels
Cost about $30g

One thing is that in Qld at least, full chassis cars (meaning a ute) is basically the only thing you can use as you conversion easily due to regs about rollover, the batterys must remain attached and contained- much easier to do in a full chassis design than a normal car
If a 4 door was required a hilux or other brand crewcab ute would be a good starting point

http://www.thebackshed.com/basiclynatural/EVConversion.asp


I never thought of electrifying a ute. Given the very large mass and volume of the batteries needed, that makes perfect sense.

As said by boppa “the chassis is the requirement”.

Reply Quote

Date: 16/02/2018 07:27:53
From: Stumpy_seahorse
ID: 1188866
Subject: re: Electrification of older cars

mollwollfumble said:


boppa said:

Pops in, havent posted here for ages, I was googling and this thread came up (sorry about the necro btw)
Its interesting how wrong many people are about electric conversions- I know of several, one was up near where D.O. and I used to be
Hilux ute, 200km range, acceleration double the factory diesel with a top speed almost 30kmh paster than the IC motor and still has a full 1 tonne capacity (and often tows a trailer with another tonne on it)- all run purely off solar panels
Cost about $30g

One thing is that in Qld at least, full chassis cars (meaning a ute) is basically the only thing you can use as you conversion easily due to regs about rollover, the batterys must remain attached and contained- much easier to do in a full chassis design than a normal car
If a 4 door was required a hilux or other brand crewcab ute would be a good starting point

http://www.thebackshed.com/basiclynatural/EVConversion.asp


I never thought of electrifying a ute. Given the very large mass and volume of the batteries needed, that makes perfect sense.

>>still has a full 1 tonne capacity (and often tows a trailer with another tonne on it)- all run purely off solar panels

That’d be getting pretty close to maximum weght, if not over.

Many people don’t realise that maximum towing weights and towbar weighgts include the load on the tray for utes.

Reply Quote

Date: 16/02/2018 07:33:14
From: boppa
ID: 1188868
Subject: re: Electrification of older cars

its the same model as mine, he’s had it inspected and all approved- including cog checks

my ute (diesel) hilux has gvm of 4.4t, so trailer (load plus trailer) is limited to 2000kg with full load in the back of the ute

Reply Quote

Date: 16/02/2018 07:50:53
From: boppa
ID: 1188869
Subject: re: Electrification of older cars

sorry that should have been gcm, not gvm lol

with no load on the ute, trailer combo weight is another 500kg

Reply Quote

Date: 16/02/2018 08:04:28
From: Stumpy_seahorse
ID: 1188875
Subject: re: Electrification of older cars

boppa said:


its the same model as mine, he’s had it inspected and all approved- including cog checks

my ute (diesel) hilux has gvm of 4.4t, so trailer (load plus trailer) is limited to 2000kg with full load in the back of the ute

I wish I had the $$ to play around with something like that..
I’ve been keeping my eye out for training in EV servicing, but the demand for it isn’t high enough yet to warrant a dedicated course

Reply Quote

Date: 16/02/2018 08:08:20
From: roughbarked
ID: 1188878
Subject: re: Electrification of older cars

Stumpy_seahorse said:


boppa said:

its the same model as mine, he’s had it inspected and all approved- including cog checks

my ute (diesel) hilux has gvm of 4.4t, so trailer (load plus trailer) is limited to 2000kg with full load in the back of the ute

I wish I had the $$ to play around with something like that..
I’ve been keeping my eye out for training in EV servicing, but the demand for it isn’t high enough yet to warrant a dedicated course

I’m thinking of trying it out on a pushbike first. I reckon I can make my own electric pushbike for way less than one costs. Need to read up on the issue first though.

Reply Quote

Date: 16/02/2018 08:08:41
From: boppa
ID: 1188879
Subject: re: Electrification of older cars

plus there isnt a whole lot to service on them

motors like the warp need new brushes every 20 thou km or so, ac syncho ones dont even have that-only bearings and they are likely to need replacing 2 or 3 times in the life of the car… batts are sealed and the rest is standard mechanical servicing (trans oiil, diff, brakes etc)

Reply Quote

Date: 16/02/2018 08:10:19
From: boppa
ID: 1188881
Subject: re: Electrification of older cars

elec pushies are dead set simple, but using them (at least in qld) is fraught with limitations :-(

Reply Quote

Date: 16/02/2018 08:12:40
From: Stumpy_seahorse
ID: 1188886
Subject: re: Electrification of older cars

boppa said:


plus there isnt a whole lot to service on them

motors like the warp need new brushes every 20 thou km or so, ac syncho ones dont even have that-only bearings and they are likely to need replacing 2 or 3 times in the life of the car… batts are sealed and the rest is standard mechanical servicing (trans oiil, diff, brakes etc)

Do they mostly use a diff? all the ‘supercar’ type write-ups have individual motors at each wheel.

Is there much servicing on KERS style braking systems? my thoughts were there would be a bit more to them

Reply Quote

Date: 16/02/2018 08:18:54
From: boppa
ID: 1188889
Subject: re: Electrification of older cars

Home brewers mostly stick to using the original drivetrain, altho people differ on whether to just pull th ic engine and leave the gearbox in or take both out and fit the elec motor where the gearbox was coupled to the driveshaft- theres advantages to both

Trevs ute left the gearbox in, lets him run lower rpm on the motor and still shift down for starting- plus he has powersteering and aircon fitted to the front pulley on the motor, so at the lights can put it in neutral and leave them running

You can buy electric diffs with twin motors from china, but they are $$$

DC motors usually dont have regen (altho some are set up for it) AC motors usually have it built into the controller, a lot of people have been playing with it

Reply Quote

Date: 16/02/2018 08:22:07
From: Stumpy_seahorse
ID: 1188891
Subject: re: Electrification of older cars

boppa said:


Home brewers mostly stick to using the original drivetrain, altho people differ on whether to just pull th ic engine and leave the gearbox in or take both out and fit the elec motor where the gearbox was coupled to the driveshaft- theres advantages to both

Trevs ute left the gearbox in, lets him run lower rpm on the motor and still shift down for starting- plus he has powersteering and aircon fitted to the front pulley on the motor, so at the lights can put it in neutral and leave them running

You can buy electric diffs with twin motors from china, but they are $$$

DC motors usually dont have regen (altho some are set up for it) AC motors usually have it built into the controller, a lot of people have been playing with it

it’s all interesting stuff..
maybe a few years down the track might have a chance to play with it

Reply Quote

Date: 16/02/2018 08:24:24
From: boppa
ID: 1188892
Subject: re: Electrification of older cars

Theres a guy who races (mostly brisbakers) with an electric racecar, does pretty well and has just finished his new car which fixes some of the flaws of the first- he was going up against porsches and the like and beating quite a few

Reply Quote

Date: 16/02/2018 08:28:36
From: Stumpy_seahorse
ID: 1188893
Subject: re: Electrification of older cars

boppa said:


Theres a guy who races (mostly brisbakers) with an electric racecar, does pretty well and has just finished his new car which fixes some of the flaws of the first- he was going up against porsches and the like and beating quite a few

there’s a couple of very interesting electric top fuel style dragsters in ammerica at the moment.
Not quite there yet, but the potential is amazing

Reply Quote

Date: 16/02/2018 08:33:51
From: boppa
ID: 1188895
Subject: re: Electrification of older cars

Still under construction, hes got some utubes up of the old car somewhere

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XXhOVGg55hI

He beat 6 out of 13 Lotuses and 9 out of 16 Porsches…. not bad for a homebrewed electric car…

Reply Quote

Date: 16/02/2018 08:43:04
From: Stumpy_seahorse
ID: 1188901
Subject: re: Electrification of older cars

boppa said:


Still under construction, hes got some utubes up of the old car somewhere

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XXhOVGg55hI

He beat 6 out of 13 Lotuses and 9 out of 16 Porsches…. not bad for a homebrewed electric car…

very nice work.

I think our modlites would be perfect for an electric motor swap

Reply Quote

Date: 16/02/2018 08:46:08
From: boppa
ID: 1188903
Subject: re: Electrification of older cars

nice………

Reply Quote

Date: 16/02/2018 08:55:41
From: Michael V
ID: 1188906
Subject: re: Electrification of older cars

boppa said:


Still under construction, hes got some utubes up of the old car somewhere

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XXhOVGg55hI

He beat 6 out of 13 Lotuses and 9 out of 16 Porsches…. not bad for a homebrewed electric car…

Electric road-race bikes at the Isle of Man were amazing. Fast and quick.

Reply Quote

Date: 16/02/2018 08:58:54
From: boppa
ID: 1188907
Subject: re: Electrification of older cars

There was a mob in Melbourne a while back that had electric bikes- from scooters to full road racers, they were impressively fast (200kmh plus) and decent range too, but too pricey, afaik they closed down a couple of years ago :-(

Reply Quote

Date: 16/02/2018 09:02:07
From: Stumpy_seahorse
ID: 1188910
Subject: re: Electrification of older cars

boppa said:


There was a mob in Melbourne a while back that had electric bikes- from scooters to full road racers, they were impressively fast (200kmh plus) and decent range too, but too pricey, afaik they closed down a couple of years ago :-(

I need to find an electric motor that just runs a shaft with a bicycle gear on it (with controller etc..) then I can get my pedal cart under power..

Reply Quote

Date: 16/02/2018 09:04:18
From: boppa
ID: 1188913
Subject: re: Electrification of older cars

That shouldnt be too hard, but do you use bicycle rims on it?
if so a hub motor would make more sense

Reply Quote

Date: 16/02/2018 09:06:47
From: Michael V
ID: 1188915
Subject: re: Electrification of older cars

boppa said:


There was a mob in Melbourne a while back that had electric bikes- from scooters to full road racers, they were impressively fast (200kmh plus) and decent range too, but too pricey, afaik they closed down a couple of years ago :-(
Bugger.

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Date: 16/02/2018 09:08:10
From: Stumpy_seahorse
ID: 1188917
Subject: re: Electrification of older cars

boppa said:


That shouldnt be too hard, but do you use bicycle rims on it?
if so a hub motor would make more sense

no, it hasn’t, it has 6” wheels on it.

but it has a gearbox where I gcan disengage the pedals and free-wheel, so if I could do that and engage an electrically driven ear, that should work

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