Date: 9/07/2018 13:09:18
From: PermeateFree
ID: 1250146
Subject: Will dust prevent us living on the Moon?

>>For one thing, it was as dry as it’s possible to be, and bombardment by solar and cosmic radiation had left the particles with a static electric charge. This made the dust stick to the astronauts’ spacesuits as a grayish, black powder that was almost impossible to shift and ended up contaminating both the interior of the Lunar Module and the orbiting Command Module when they returned, making them smell like burned gunpowder.

Worse, the dryness and radiation made the dust chemically active and the particles were so abrasive that they took their toll on the spacesuits, sample containers, and other equipment.

Silicate dust is already a hazard on Earth, especially for miners or people exposed to dust storms or volcanic eruptions, which can cause a condition called silicosis. But lunar dust is different. The highly active environment of Earth wears down silicate particles, so they become rounded, but moon dust has sharp, jagged edges that make it so abrasive that it wore away at the special outer boots worn by the moon walkers. What this would do to lung tissue can only be imagined at this point.<<

https://newatlas.com/dust-moon-living/55333/

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Date: 9/07/2018 13:18:35
From: Cymek
ID: 1250150
Subject: re: Will dust prevent us living on the Moon?

PermeateFree said:


>>For one thing, it was as dry as it’s possible to be, and bombardment by solar and cosmic radiation had left the particles with a static electric charge. This made the dust stick to the astronauts’ spacesuits as a grayish, black powder that was almost impossible to shift and ended up contaminating both the interior of the Lunar Module and the orbiting Command Module when they returned, making them smell like burned gunpowder.

Worse, the dryness and radiation made the dust chemically active and the particles were so abrasive that they took their toll on the spacesuits, sample containers, and other equipment.

Silicate dust is already a hazard on Earth, especially for miners or people exposed to dust storms or volcanic eruptions, which can cause a condition called silicosis. But lunar dust is different. The highly active environment of Earth wears down silicate particles, so they become rounded, but moon dust has sharp, jagged edges that make it so abrasive that it wore away at the special outer boots worn by the moon walkers. What this would do to lung tissue can only be imagined at this point.<<

https://newatlas.com/dust-moon-living/55333/

I imagine it would be quite a problem, have to find a way to destatisfy everything, perhaps some sort of decontamination shower (not water). Short term space exploration lets alone colonisation seems to reveal more and more problems both health and technical problems (probably overcome the former but the later could be a real problem) People might have to accept shorter lifespans as the price to pay

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Date: 9/07/2018 13:25:30
From: AwesomeO
ID: 1250151
Subject: re: Will dust prevent us living on the Moon?

Cymek said:


PermeateFree said:

>>For one thing, it was as dry as it’s possible to be, and bombardment by solar and cosmic radiation had left the particles with a static electric charge. This made the dust stick to the astronauts’ spacesuits as a grayish, black powder that was almost impossible to shift and ended up contaminating both the interior of the Lunar Module and the orbiting Command Module when they returned, making them smell like burned gunpowder.

Worse, the dryness and radiation made the dust chemically active and the particles were so abrasive that they took their toll on the spacesuits, sample containers, and other equipment.

Silicate dust is already a hazard on Earth, especially for miners or people exposed to dust storms or volcanic eruptions, which can cause a condition called silicosis. But lunar dust is different. The highly active environment of Earth wears down silicate particles, so they become rounded, but moon dust has sharp, jagged edges that make it so abrasive that it wore away at the special outer boots worn by the moon walkers. What this would do to lung tissue can only be imagined at this point.<<

https://newatlas.com/dust-moon-living/55333/

I imagine it would be quite a problem, have to find a way to destatisfy everything, perhaps some sort of decontamination shower (not water). Short term space exploration lets alone colonisation seems to reveal more and more problems both health and technical problems (probably overcome the former but the later could be a real problem) People might have to accept shorter lifespans as the price to pay

Have them enter the habitat after going through a chamber of rotating emu feathers like a car wash then into a secondary change room.

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Date: 9/07/2018 13:35:53
From: AwesomeO
ID: 1250152
Subject: re: Will dust prevent us living on the Moon?

And on the sunny side abrasive dust might have a use in sandblasting tunnels for living quarters away from solar radiation.

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Date: 9/07/2018 13:39:11
From: AwesomeO
ID: 1250154
Subject: re: Will dust prevent us living on the Moon?

AwesomeO said:


And on the sunny side abrasive dust might have a use in sandblasting tunnels for living quarters away from solar radiation.

Though having said that I suddenly realised I have no idea how you would drive such a powerful engine, an internal combustion one would be out, so presumably only a chemical rocket type engine to drive a pump would work? Or maybe, nuclear generator to provide current to a electric generator and you could take advantage of static charges to create a wall to reduce erosion.

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Date: 9/07/2018 13:43:41
From: PermeateFree
ID: 1250155
Subject: re: Will dust prevent us living on the Moon?

AwesomeO said:


AwesomeO said:

And on the sunny side abrasive dust might have a use in sandblasting tunnels for living quarters away from solar radiation.

Though having said that I suddenly realised I have no idea how you would drive such a powerful engine, an internal combustion one would be out, so presumably only a chemical rocket type engine to drive a pump would work? Or maybe, nuclear generator to provide current to a electric generator and you could take advantage of static charges to create a wall to reduce erosion.

Damn, another Luna problem.

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