Date: 11/07/2018 09:56:03
From: The Rev Dodgson
ID: 1250871
Subject: How long have we been here?

… where “we” is humans (i.e. members of the species known as Homo Sapiens), and “here” is the large island now known as Australia.

Someone said 80,000 years the other day, but I’m wondering if that is the current best guess, an upper limit, or maybe just stretching things a little.

Reply Quote

Date: 11/07/2018 09:58:26
From: roughbarked
ID: 1250873
Subject: re: How long have we been here?

The Rev Dodgson said:


… where “we” is humans (i.e. members of the species known as Homo Sapiens), and “here” is the large island now known as Australia.

Someone said 80,000 years the other day, but I’m wondering if that is the current best guess, an upper limit, or maybe just stretching things a little.

It could be said that an exact date is yet to be determined. Many figures have been bandied about.

Reply Quote

Date: 11/07/2018 10:02:23
From: The Rev Dodgson
ID: 1250875
Subject: re: How long have we been here?

roughbarked said:


The Rev Dodgson said:

… where “we” is humans (i.e. members of the species known as Homo Sapiens), and “here” is the large island now known as Australia.

Someone said 80,000 years the other day, but I’m wondering if that is the current best guess, an upper limit, or maybe just stretching things a little.

It could be said that an exact date is yet to be determined. Many figures have been bandied about.

I knew that :)

Reply Quote

Date: 11/07/2018 10:04:01
From: Bubblecar
ID: 1250876
Subject: re: How long have we been here?

From July last year:

Human occupation of northern Australia by 65,000 years ago

Abstract

The time of arrival of people in Australia is an unresolved question. It is relevant to debates about when modern humans first dispersed out of Africa and when their descendants incorporated genetic material from Neanderthals, Denisovans and possibly other hominins. Humans have also been implicated in the extinction of Australia’s megafauna. Here we report the results of new excavations conducted at Madjedbebe, a rock shelter in northern Australia. Artefacts in primary depositional context are concentrated in three dense bands, with the stratigraphic integrity of the deposit demonstrated by artefact refits and by optical dating and other analyses of the sediments. Human occupation began around 65,000 years ago, with a distinctive stone tool assemblage including grinding stones, ground ochres, reflective additives and ground-edge hatchet heads. This evidence sets a new minimum age for the arrival of humans in Australia, the dispersal of modern humans out of Africa, and the subsequent interactions of modern humans with Neanderthals and Denisovans.

https://www.nature.com/articles/nature22968

Reply Quote

Date: 11/07/2018 10:05:33
From: roughbarked
ID: 1250877
Subject: re: How long have we been here?

The Rev Dodgson said:


roughbarked said:

The Rev Dodgson said:

… where “we” is humans (i.e. members of the species known as Homo Sapiens), and “here” is the large island now known as Australia.

Someone said 80,000 years the other day, but I’m wondering if that is the current best guess, an upper limit, or maybe just stretching things a little.

It could be said that an exact date is yet to be determined. Many figures have been bandied about.

I knew that :)

That maks two of us then. I get confused when I hold an artifact that shows both ancient and more modern tchniques of tool making and found in an almost indescribable place that couldn’t possibly have had the tropical rainforest environs desribed as that of the few other tools of this type.. it is all mind boggling.

Reply Quote

Date: 11/07/2018 10:06:48
From: roughbarked
ID: 1250879
Subject: re: How long have we been here?

Bubblecar said:


From July last year:

Human occupation of northern Australia by 65,000 years ago

Abstract

The time of arrival of people in Australia is an unresolved question. It is relevant to debates about when modern humans first dispersed out of Africa and when their descendants incorporated genetic material from Neanderthals, Denisovans and possibly other hominins. Humans have also been implicated in the extinction of Australia’s megafauna. Here we report the results of new excavations conducted at Madjedbebe, a rock shelter in northern Australia. Artefacts in primary depositional context are concentrated in three dense bands, with the stratigraphic integrity of the deposit demonstrated by artefact refits and by optical dating and other analyses of the sediments. Human occupation began around 65,000 years ago, with a distinctive stone tool assemblage including grinding stones, ground ochres, reflective additives and ground-edge hatchet heads. This evidence sets a new minimum age for the arrival of humans in Australia, the dispersal of modern humans out of Africa, and the subsequent interactions of modern humans with Neanderthals and Denisovans.

https://www.nature.com/articles/nature22968

Yet there are known older dates.

Reply Quote

Date: 11/07/2018 10:07:59
From: The Rev Dodgson
ID: 1250881
Subject: re: How long have we been here?

roughbarked said:


Bubblecar said:

From July last year:

Human occupation of northern Australia by 65,000 years ago

Abstract

The time of arrival of people in Australia is an unresolved question. It is relevant to debates about when modern humans first dispersed out of Africa and when their descendants incorporated genetic material from Neanderthals, Denisovans and possibly other hominins. Humans have also been implicated in the extinction of Australia’s megafauna. Here we report the results of new excavations conducted at Madjedbebe, a rock shelter in northern Australia. Artefacts in primary depositional context are concentrated in three dense bands, with the stratigraphic integrity of the deposit demonstrated by artefact refits and by optical dating and other analyses of the sediments. Human occupation began around 65,000 years ago, with a distinctive stone tool assemblage including grinding stones, ground ochres, reflective additives and ground-edge hatchet heads. This evidence sets a new minimum age for the arrival of humans in Australia, the dispersal of modern humans out of Africa, and the subsequent interactions of modern humans with Neanderthals and Denisovans.

https://www.nature.com/articles/nature22968

Yet there are known older dates.

Got any refs?

Reply Quote

Date: 11/07/2018 10:10:59
From: roughbarked
ID: 1250884
Subject: re: How long have we been here?

The Rev Dodgson said:


roughbarked said:

Bubblecar said:

From July last year:

Human occupation of northern Australia by 65,000 years ago

Abstract

The time of arrival of people in Australia is an unresolved question. It is relevant to debates about when modern humans first dispersed out of Africa and when their descendants incorporated genetic material from Neanderthals, Denisovans and possibly other hominins. Humans have also been implicated in the extinction of Australia’s megafauna. Here we report the results of new excavations conducted at Madjedbebe, a rock shelter in northern Australia. Artefacts in primary depositional context are concentrated in three dense bands, with the stratigraphic integrity of the deposit demonstrated by artefact refits and by optical dating and other analyses of the sediments. Human occupation began around 65,000 years ago, with a distinctive stone tool assemblage including grinding stones, ground ochres, reflective additives and ground-edge hatchet heads. This evidence sets a new minimum age for the arrival of humans in Australia, the dispersal of modern humans out of Africa, and the subsequent interactions of modern humans with Neanderthals and Denisovans.

https://www.nature.com/articles/nature22968

Yet there are known older dates.

Got any refs?

Not on hand. but I recall many reports. ie; one age of hair found in Australia as at 70,000 and various postulations up to 130,000.

Reply Quote

Date: 11/07/2018 12:24:40
From: The Rev Dodgson
ID: 1250913
Subject: re: How long have we been here?

TATE is pretty confused on this question, but it looks like the earliest date with good evidence is 65,000 years ago:

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/07/19/science/humans-reached-australia-aboriginal-65000-years.html

There do seem to be suggestions of up to 120,000 years, based on changes in frequency of fires. It seems that the arrival and/or evolution of modern humans in E Asia may have happened much earlier than previously thought, so the earlier date seems possible.

I wonder when archaeological investigation of sites under about 100 of water will become feasible.

Reply Quote

Date: 11/07/2018 12:58:33
From: Ian
ID: 1250928
Subject: re: How long have we been here?

The Rev Dodgson said:


TATE is pretty confused on this question, but it looks like the earliest date with good evidence is 65,000 years ago:

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/07/19/science/humans-reached-australia-aboriginal-65000-years.html

There do seem to be suggestions of up to 120,000 years, based on changes in frequency of fires. It seems that the arrival and/or evolution of modern humans in E Asia may have happened much earlier than previously thought, so the earlier date seems possible.

I wonder when archaeological investigation of sites under about 100 of water will become feasible.

Yeah, the figure of 65,000 years seems to pop up frequently.

“During excavations of the Madjedbebe rock shelter in northern Australia, researchers have found thousands of artefacts, including stone tools, grinding stones and hatchets, showing humans must have been at the site at least 65,000 years ago.”

Newsweek

Reply Quote

Date: 11/07/2018 12:59:54
From: PermeateFree
ID: 1250929
Subject: re: How long have we been here?

The Rev Dodgson said:


TATE is pretty confused on this question, but it looks like the earliest date with good evidence is 65,000 years ago:

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/07/19/science/humans-reached-australia-aboriginal-65000-years.html

There do seem to be suggestions of up to 120,000 years, based on changes in frequency of fires. It seems that the arrival and/or evolution of modern humans in E Asia may have happened much earlier than previously thought, so the earlier date seems possible.

I wonder when archaeological investigation of sites under about 100 of water will become feasible.

I would think the frequency of ice ages when sealevels were at their lowest, would also be a good indicator.

Reply Quote

Date: 11/07/2018 13:05:06
From: PermeateFree
ID: 1250930
Subject: re: How long have we been here?

PermeateFree said:


The Rev Dodgson said:

TATE is pretty confused on this question, but it looks like the earliest date with good evidence is 65,000 years ago:

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/07/19/science/humans-reached-australia-aboriginal-65000-years.html

There do seem to be suggestions of up to 120,000 years, based on changes in frequency of fires. It seems that the arrival and/or evolution of modern humans in E Asia may have happened much earlier than previously thought, so the earlier date seems possible.

I wonder when archaeological investigation of sites under about 100 of water will become feasible.

I would think the frequency of ice ages when sealevels were at their lowest, would also be a good indicator.

Reply Quote

Date: 11/07/2018 13:07:08
From: buffy
ID: 1250932
Subject: re: How long have we been here?

PermeateFree said:


PermeateFree said:

The Rev Dodgson said:

TATE is pretty confused on this question, but it looks like the earliest date with good evidence is 65,000 years ago:

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/07/19/science/humans-reached-australia-aboriginal-65000-years.html

There do seem to be suggestions of up to 120,000 years, based on changes in frequency of fires. It seems that the arrival and/or evolution of modern humans in E Asia may have happened much earlier than previously thought, so the earlier date seems possible.

I wonder when archaeological investigation of sites under about 100 of water will become feasible.

I would think the frequency of ice ages when sealevels were at their lowest, would also be a good indicator.


Looks like we’ve only just popped up out of a glacial.

Reply Quote

Date: 11/07/2018 14:33:58
From: Peak Warming Man
ID: 1250952
Subject: re: How long have we been here?

buffy said:


PermeateFree said:

PermeateFree said:

I would think the frequency of ice ages when sealevels were at their lowest, would also be a good indicator.


Looks like we’ve only just popped up out of a glacial.

If you draw a line through the Glacical low points you’ll see a definite cooling trend and to be perfectly Frank I don’t think a bit of co2 is going to change that trend.
What worries me about that trend is that if it keeps cooling like that we may not recover.
It could be the next Glacical or the one after that, we just don’t know but it’s worth keeping an eye on.

Reply Quote

Date: 11/07/2018 14:49:40
From: The Rev Dodgson
ID: 1250954
Subject: re: How long have we been here?

Peak Warming Man said:


buffy said:

PermeateFree said:


Looks like we’ve only just popped up out of a glacial.

If you draw a line through the Glacical low points you’ll see a definite cooling trend and to be perfectly Frank I don’t think a bit of co2 is going to change that trend.
What worries me about that trend is that if it keeps cooling like that we may not recover.
It could be the next Glacical or the one after that, we just don’t know but it’s worth keeping an eye on.

Yes, I think you are right.

Clearly, looking at the long term, we should keep as much fossil fuel in reserve as possible, so we can bump the temperature up when we really need to.

Reply Quote

Date: 11/07/2018 14:54:52
From: transition
ID: 1250955
Subject: re: How long have we been here?

Peak Warming Man said:


buffy said:

PermeateFree said:


Looks like we’ve only just popped up out of a glacial.

If you draw a line through the Glacical low points you’ll see a definite cooling trend and to be perfectly Frank I don’t think a bit of co2 is going to change that trend.
What worries me about that trend is that if it keeps cooling like that we may not recover.
It could be the next Glacical or the one after that, we just don’t know but it’s worth keeping an eye on.

chuckle

the thread title has me thinking about white mans’ year, the orbit of the spinning rock around the sun, whether there’s more to it than that, and while we count backwards to reconcile how long, what the original inhabitants might think about that.

Reply Quote

Date: 11/07/2018 15:24:08
From: The Rev Dodgson
ID: 1250967
Subject: re: How long have we been here?

transition said:


Peak Warming Man said:

buffy said:

Looks like we’ve only just popped up out of a glacial.

If you draw a line through the Glacical low points you’ll see a definite cooling trend and to be perfectly Frank I don’t think a bit of co2 is going to change that trend.
What worries me about that trend is that if it keeps cooling like that we may not recover.
It could be the next Glacical or the one after that, we just don’t know but it’s worth keeping an eye on.

chuckle

the thread title has me thinking about white mans’ year, the orbit of the spinning rock around the sun, whether there’s more to it than that, and while we count backwards to reconcile how long, what the original inhabitants might think about that.

It’s not the “white mans’year”. Whoever can claim ownership to the concept, their skin colour certainly would have been a shade of brown.

Reply Quote

Date: 11/07/2018 15:46:20
From: transition
ID: 1250969
Subject: re: How long have we been here?

The Rev Dodgson said:


transition said:

Peak Warming Man said:

If you draw a line through the Glacical low points you’ll see a definite cooling trend and to be perfectly Frank I don’t think a bit of co2 is going to change that trend.
What worries me about that trend is that if it keeps cooling like that we may not recover.
It could be the next Glacical or the one after that, we just don’t know but it’s worth keeping an eye on.

chuckle

the thread title has me thinking about white mans’ year, the orbit of the spinning rock around the sun, whether there’s more to it than that, and while we count backwards to reconcile how long, what the original inhabitants might think about that.

It’s not the “white mans’year”. Whoever can claim ownership to the concept, their skin colour certainly would have been a shade of brown.

fairly sure that the orbiting rock thing, punctuated by resetting Christmases, end of financial year tax returns and all, it’s white mans’ year.

anyway, the comment was only to point to what did the original inhabitants do before the imposition?.

Reply Quote

Date: 11/07/2018 15:56:11
From: The Rev Dodgson
ID: 1250970
Subject: re: How long have we been here?

transition said:


The Rev Dodgson said:

transition said:

chuckle

the thread title has me thinking about white mans’ year, the orbit of the spinning rock around the sun, whether there’s more to it than that, and while we count backwards to reconcile how long, what the original inhabitants might think about that.

It’s not the “white mans’year”. Whoever can claim ownership to the concept, their skin colour certainly would have been a shade of brown.

fairly sure that the orbiting rock thing, punctuated by resetting Christmases, end of financial year tax returns and all, it’s white mans’ year.

anyway, the comment was only to point to what did the original inhabitants do before the imposition?.

What imposition are you talking about?

They certainly wouldn’t have had Christmases of tax returns, but it seems highly likely that they would have had an annual cycle, and this would have been about 365 1/4 days long.

Reply Quote

Date: 11/07/2018 15:59:21
From: Bogsnorkler
ID: 1250971
Subject: re: How long have we been here?

The Rev Dodgson said:


transition said:

The Rev Dodgson said:

It’s not the “white mans’year”. Whoever can claim ownership to the concept, their skin colour certainly would have been a shade of brown.

fairly sure that the orbiting rock thing, punctuated by resetting Christmases, end of financial year tax returns and all, it’s white mans’ year.

anyway, the comment was only to point to what did the original inhabitants do before the imposition?.

What imposition are you talking about?

They certainly wouldn’t have had Christmases of tax returns, but it seems highly likely that they would have had an annual cycle, and this would have been about 365 1/4 days long.

well yes, seeing as they has seasons there must have been some concept of a year. a rose by any other name etc…

Reply Quote

Date: 11/07/2018 16:09:55
From: transition
ID: 1250972
Subject: re: How long have we been here?

The Rev Dodgson said:


transition said:

The Rev Dodgson said:

It’s not the “white mans’year”. Whoever can claim ownership to the concept, their skin colour certainly would have been a shade of brown.

fairly sure that the orbiting rock thing, punctuated by resetting Christmases, end of financial year tax returns and all, it’s white mans’ year.

anyway, the comment was only to point to what did the original inhabitants do before the imposition?.

What imposition are you talking about?

They certainly wouldn’t have had Christmases of tax returns, but it seems highly likely that they would have had an annual cycle, and this would have been about 365 1/4 days long.

they quite possibly had no concept of a spinning rock orbiting the sun.

i’m just wondering how they managed, without that and Christmas and tax returns etc, the sorta temporal lens (fs you like) through which you and I see things.

tell me when you look back and count how long you’re not imposing something, perhaps without knowing it.

Reply Quote

Date: 11/07/2018 16:26:21
From: The Rev Dodgson
ID: 1250973
Subject: re: How long have we been here?

transition said:


The Rev Dodgson said:

transition said:

fairly sure that the orbiting rock thing, punctuated by resetting Christmases, end of financial year tax returns and all, it’s white mans’ year.

anyway, the comment was only to point to what did the original inhabitants do before the imposition?.

What imposition are you talking about?

They certainly wouldn’t have had Christmases of tax returns, but it seems highly likely that they would have had an annual cycle, and this would have been about 365 1/4 days long.

they quite possibly had no concept of a spinning rock orbiting the sun.

i’m just wondering how they managed, without that and Christmas and tax returns etc, the sorta temporal lens (fs you like) through which you and I see things.

tell me when you look back and count how long you’re not imposing something, perhaps without knowing it.

I don’t think the spinning rock orbiting the sun concept makes any difference to our concept of time. Not a significant one anyway.

As for Christmas and tax returns, they are totally insignificant compared with the annual changes in the seasons and the associated behaviour changes in plants and animals.

Reply Quote

Date: 11/07/2018 16:31:48
From: AwesomeO
ID: 1250975
Subject: re: How long have we been here?

The Rev Dodgson said:


transition said:

The Rev Dodgson said:

What imposition are you talking about?

They certainly wouldn’t have had Christmases of tax returns, but it seems highly likely that they would have had an annual cycle, and this would have been about 365 1/4 days long.

they quite possibly had no concept of a spinning rock orbiting the sun.

i’m just wondering how they managed, without that and Christmas and tax returns etc, the sorta temporal lens (fs you like) through which you and I see things.

tell me when you look back and count how long you’re not imposing something, perhaps without knowing it.

I don’t think the spinning rock orbiting the sun concept makes any difference to our concept of time. Not a significant one anyway.

As for Christmas and tax returns, they are totally insignificant compared with the annual changes in the seasons and the associated behaviour changes in plants and animals.

Before Christmas was Christmas it was a celebration of the winter solstice and the end of winter.

Reply Quote

Date: 11/07/2018 16:35:50
From: transition
ID: 1250976
Subject: re: How long have we been here?

The Rev Dodgson said:


transition said:

The Rev Dodgson said:

What imposition are you talking about?

They certainly wouldn’t have had Christmases of tax returns, but it seems highly likely that they would have had an annual cycle, and this would have been about 365 1/4 days long.

they quite possibly had no concept of a spinning rock orbiting the sun.

i’m just wondering how they managed, without that and Christmas and tax returns etc, the sorta temporal lens (fs you like) through which you and I see things.

tell me when you look back and count how long you’re not imposing something, perhaps without knowing it.

I don’t think the spinning rock orbiting the sun concept makes any difference to our concept of time. Not a significant one anyway.

As for Christmas and tax returns, they are totally insignificant compared with the annual changes in the seasons and the associated behaviour changes in plants and animals.

i’d be seriously reluctant to assert that birthdays, christmas, calendars, clocks, the working week, weekends, and much more related don’t strongly influence your experience of the now, and view of the past (how ancestors experienced it).

if I had give it name, call them temporal controls, I wouldn’t dismiss their power.

Reply Quote

Date: 11/07/2018 16:45:39
From: Peak Warming Man
ID: 1250978
Subject: re: How long have we been here?

I’m not the same person I was 10 years ago, I’m made up of completely new cells, the cells I was made up of 10 years ago are dead, all dead.
However the PWM project continues.

Reply Quote

Date: 11/07/2018 16:57:54
From: The Rev Dodgson
ID: 1250981
Subject: re: How long have we been here?

transition said:


The Rev Dodgson said:

transition said:

they quite possibly had no concept of a spinning rock orbiting the sun.

i’m just wondering how they managed, without that and Christmas and tax returns etc, the sorta temporal lens (fs you like) through which you and I see things.

tell me when you look back and count how long you’re not imposing something, perhaps without knowing it.

I don’t think the spinning rock orbiting the sun concept makes any difference to our concept of time. Not a significant one anyway.

As for Christmas and tax returns, they are totally insignificant compared with the annual changes in the seasons and the associated behaviour changes in plants and animals.

i’d be seriously reluctant to assert that birthdays, christmas, calendars, clocks, the working week, weekends, and much more related don’t strongly influence your experience of the now, and view of the past (how ancestors experienced it).

if I had give it name, call them temporal controls, I wouldn’t dismiss their power.

But do they have more power than the temporal controls that are important in a hunter-gatherer culture or similar?

I very much doubt it. The opposite, if anything.

Reply Quote

Date: 11/07/2018 17:00:01
From: The Rev Dodgson
ID: 1250983
Subject: re: How long have we been here?

Peak Warming Man said:


I’m not the same person I was 10 years ago, I’m made up of completely new cells, the cells I was made up of 10 years ago are dead, all dead.
However the PWM project continues.

Yes, the relationships between certain of your cells, whilst not unchanging, have a continuous common PWMist theme.

Reply Quote

Date: 11/07/2018 17:01:48
From: Bogsnorkler
ID: 1250984
Subject: re: How long have we been here?

Peak Warming Man said:


I’m not the same person I was 10 years ago, I’m made up of completely new cells, the cells I was made up of 10 years ago are dead, all dead.
However the PWM project continues.

Holly:
They’re dead, Dave. Every cell is dead. Every cell is dead, Dave.

Lister:
Wait. Are you trying to tell me every cell is dead?

Holly:
Should’ve never let him out in the first place….

Reply Quote

Date: 11/07/2018 17:03:33
From: transition
ID: 1250985
Subject: re: How long have we been here?

The Rev Dodgson said:


transition said:

The Rev Dodgson said:

I don’t think the spinning rock orbiting the sun concept makes any difference to our concept of time. Not a significant one anyway.

As for Christmas and tax returns, they are totally insignificant compared with the annual changes in the seasons and the associated behaviour changes in plants and animals.

i’d be seriously reluctant to assert that birthdays, christmas, calendars, clocks, the working week, weekends, and much more related don’t strongly influence your experience of the now, and view of the past (how ancestors experienced it).

if I had give it name, call them temporal controls, I wouldn’t dismiss their power.

But do they have more power than the temporal controls that are important in a hunter-gatherer culture or similar?

I very much doubt it. The opposite, if anything.

yes, but the propositions I put didn’t assert they were more or less of our ancestors compared with modern times, it asserted that when you and I look back we insert the modern view, ignore the distortions in doing so, as they are largely unconscious.

so, i’m saying what’s an extra twenty thousand years, who’s counting and why?

Reply Quote

Date: 11/07/2018 17:29:32
From: The Rev Dodgson
ID: 1251002
Subject: re: How long have we been here?

transition said:


so, i’m saying what’s an extra twenty thousand years, who’s counting and why?

I’m not much concerned with the number of years.

More the order in which things happened, and how they happened.

Why?

It seems interesting. That’s all.

Reply Quote

Date: 11/07/2018 17:32:35
From: AwesomeO
ID: 1251003
Subject: re: How long have we been here?

On the Drum now, for NAIDOC week, oldest living culture in the world. I reckon Kalahari bushmen and the isolated PNG tribes could beat that record.

Reply Quote

Date: 11/07/2018 17:37:19
From: The Rev Dodgson
ID: 1251005
Subject: re: How long have we been here?

AwesomeO said:


On the Drum now, for NAIDOC week, oldest living culture in the world. I reckon Kalahari bushmen and the isolated PNG tribes could beat that record.

Yeah, that’s what the 80,000 year woman said as well.

I think it’s a shame these things are seen as being politically significant.

Reply Quote

Date: 11/07/2018 17:47:03
From: Witty Rejoinder
ID: 1251007
Subject: re: How long have we been here?

AwesomeO said:


On the Drum now, for NAIDOC week, oldest living culture in the world. I reckon Kalahari bushmen and the isolated PNG tribes could beat that record.

The same factors that could be used to question the longevity of Aboriginal settlement in Australia apply to those two groups as well.

Reply Quote

Date: 11/07/2018 22:45:51
From: transition
ID: 1251066
Subject: re: How long have we been here?

The Rev Dodgson said:


transition said:

so, i’m saying what’s an extra twenty thousand years, who’s counting and why?

I’m not much concerned with the number of years.

More the order in which things happened, and how they happened.

Why?

It seems interesting. That’s all.

fair enough, i’m a pain in the arse sometimes, don’t mind me

Reply Quote

Date: 11/07/2018 22:47:40
From: roughbarked
ID: 1251069
Subject: re: How long have we been here?

transition said:


The Rev Dodgson said:

transition said:

so, i’m saying what’s an extra twenty thousand years, who’s counting and why?

I’m not much concerned with the number of years.

More the order in which things happened, and how they happened.

Why?

It seems interesting. That’s all.

fair enough, i’m a pain in the arse sometimes, don’t mind me

Now is when we need Andy’s Prehistoric clock.

Reply Quote

Date: 11/07/2018 22:56:17
From: roughbarked
ID: 1251073
Subject: re: How long have we been here?

roughbarked said:


transition said:

The Rev Dodgson said:

I’m not much concerned with the number of years.

More the order in which things happened, and how they happened.

Why?

It seems interesting. That’s all.

fair enough, i’m a pain in the arse sometimes, don’t mind me

Now is when we need Andy’s Prehistoric clock.

When I mentioned an odd tool bforehand, I was referring to the ooyruka which was described by Dr Richard Cosgrove in his study of 20 found in FNQ that were all made from ground and polished hornfels slate. He described them as a rainforest tool that contained traces of plant material. Dated at around 5,000 years or after the last ice age.
I sent him photos of the one found in a place that couldn’t have had rainforest in it within say 50,000 years at a rough guess. Who knows? What else is there to compare it with? It was made from vesicular basalt and mostly pecked into shape with only the one ground flat edge. Same tool, same usage but way more primitive. But only one as to twenty.

So much has been missed destroyed or glossed over by economic growth.
I have one in my possession

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Date: 11/07/2018 23:08:47
From: The Rev Dodgson
ID: 1251082
Subject: re: How long have we been here?

transition said:


The Rev Dodgson said:

transition said:

so, i’m saying what’s an extra twenty thousand years, who’s counting and why?

I’m not much concerned with the number of years.

More the order in which things happened, and how they happened.

Why?

It seems interesting. That’s all.

fair enough, i’m a pain in the arse sometimes, don’t mind me

I don’t :)

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